Program and Agenda

Abstract

RESTORING OCEAN HEALTH AND PRIMARY PRODUCTIVITY WITH MANAGED SEAWEED FORESTS: A MASS BALANCE OF CARBON AND NUTRIENT CYCLES

Oceans are experiencing multiple stressors, such as warming, acidification, coastal nutrient overloading and denitrification, resource extraction, and over-fishing. Although they are large-scale stressors, some impacts could be reduced by large-scale managed seaweed forests. Managed ocean forests are a combination of multi-trophic aquaculture and other marine agronomy concepts, whereby increased primary productivity provides carbon capture plus production of energy, food and other products. Ocean forests could be sustained in what would otherwise be nutrient deserts by continuously harvesting, separating the plant nutrients from the carbon energy, and quickly recycling the nutrients to grow more seaweed. A life cycle assessment and economic analysis using off-the-shelf technology show that managed forests, covering 9% of the world’s ocean surface, could produce 12 billion tons per year of biomethane (equal to the global fossil fuel combustion projected in 2035) and 2 billion tons per year of food, while storing 19 billion tons of CO2 per year. Longer-term, the forests could potentially contribute to restoring ocean health by removing two trillion tons of CO2 in less than 100 years while addressing the multiple stressors addressed above.

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0957582012001206

Authors

Capron, M. E., Ocean Foresters, USA, MarkCapron@OceanForesters.org

N'Yeurt, A., University of the South Pacific, Fiji, nyeurt_a@usp.ac.fj

Bednarsek, N., U.S. NOAA, USA, nina.bednarsek@noaa.gov

Hopkins, K., University of Hawaii, USA, Hopkins@hawaii.edu

Tulip, R., AusAid, Australia, Robert.Tulip@ausaid.gov.au

Details

Oral presentation

Session #:167
Date: 2/27/2014
Time: 14:30
Location: 316 C

Presentation is given by student: No