Abstract


PLASTICITY IN THERMAL TOLERANCE WINDOWS OF EARLY LIFE HISTORY STAGES

Temperature is a key factor determining the physiology and distribution of marine species. As the rate of global climate change increases, the influence of temperature becomes more relevant; however, its effects can vary across different life-history stages. Benthic marine species with planktonic larvae may experience different thermal environments during development than as adults and, therefore may also exhibit stage-dependent tolerance to thermal stress. Thermal tolerance of early life stages may also differ in its acclimatory capacity. This research aims to compare thermal tolerances of the sea urchin Tripneustes gratilla, an ecologically important grazer present on Hawaiian coral reefs, reared at 20C, 25C and 29C. In order to more accurately predict the ecological consequences of climate change, sublethal and lethal effects of temperature will be investigated, including LT50, oxygen consumption, and swimming/clearance rates of larvae. Results from LT50 measurements demonstrate that early life- history stages of this species do not exhibit a difference in their temperature dependent mortality when reared at different temperatures and that they may lack plasticity in this response to thermal stress. These findings provide a method of comparing and highlighting vulnerabilities of Tripneustes gratilla larvae by estimating their capacity for acclimation and potential for adaption to future climate change scenarios.

Authors

Genovese, C. B., University of Hawaii at Manoa, USA, cgenoves@hawaii.edu

Moran , A. L., University of Hawaii at Manoa, USA

Details

Poster presentation

Session #:05
Date: 06/22/2016
Time: 18:15 - 19:45
Location: Poster/Exhibit Hall

Presentation is given by student: Yes

PosterID: 47