Abstract


ANTIOXIDANT DEFENSE AND ACID-BASE REGULATION: PHYSIOLOGICAL TOLERANCE AND ACCLIMATIZATION TO OCEAN ACIDIFICATION AND WARMING IN POCILLOPORA DAMICORNIS

Given the rapid pace of global ocean acidification and warming, methods by which corals can use their existing physiological repertoire to tolerate changing environmental conditions may provide insight into their potential for acclimatization and longer-term persistence. Ocean acidification and warming may interact to challenge larval physiology through increased production of reactive oxygen species and modification of homeostatic intracellular pH. To examine physiological plasticity under this multi-stressor scenario, larvae of Pocillopora damicornis were exposed to levels of temperature and pCO2 after which antioxidant defense and acid-base maintenance were assessed. Planulae had higher total antioxidant potential at High-pCO2 than under ambient conditions, and planulae released at the peak of spawning had a greater response than those released two days later. Activity of catalase, an antioxidant enzyme was also measured. Partial activity of Na+/K+-ATPase did not differ significantly between treatments. One of the first examples of oxidative stress response and acid-base regulation in coral larvae, short-term plasticity of antioxidant defense in coral larvae may be an important mechanism underlying acclimatization to ocean acidification and warming.

Authors

Rivest, E. B., Bodega Marine Laboratory, University of California, Davis, USA, ebrivest@ucdavis.edu

Chen, C. S., National Museum of Marine Biology and Aquarium, Taiwan, ROC, cchen@nmmba.gov.tw

Hancock, J. R., Sonoma State University, USA, hancockj@sonoma.edu

Mydlarz, L. D., University of Texas at Arlington, USA, mydlarz@uta.edu

Hofmann, G. E., University of California, Santa Barbara, USA, gretchen.hofmann@lifesci.ucsb.edu

Details

Oral presentation

Session #:05
Date: 06/22/2016
Time: 14:15
Location: 313 B

Presentation is given by student: No