Abstract


RECRUITMENT PATTERNS OF CORAL REEF FISHES IN THE CENTRAL RED SEA: DIFFERENCES ACCORDING TO SEASON AND REEF TYPE

The Red Sea is the world's northernmost tropical sea. The latitudinal extent of its deep, narrow basin and its limited connection to the world's oceanic system make for a unique environment with extreme temperature and salinity regimes. Yet the Red Sea harbors one of the largest and most biodiverse coral reef systems in our planet. In order to better understand the impact of these unique environmental conditions on the biology of coral reef fishes, a year-long light trap study was conducted on three reefs in the central Red Sea—one inshore, one midshore and one offshore—in order to quantify seasonal timing, biomass and biodiversity of incoming reef fish recruits. Collection took place during every new moon for five consecutive nights to capture seasonal variation in recruitment at different reef types and habitats. The mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (COI) region was used to identify the trapped recruits. To date, very little is known about annual reproductive peaks in this region. This dataset will provide a useful guide for identification of recruits of coral reef fishes, and will increase the number of genetic barcodes available for coral reef fishes.

Authors

Robitzch, V., King Abdullah University for Science and Technology, Saudi Arabia, vanessa.robitzchsierra@kaust.edu.sa

Rowe, K. A., King Abdullah University for Science and Technology, Saudi Arabia, katherine.rowe@kaust.edu.sa

Berumen, M. L., King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Saudi Arabia, michael.berumen@kaust.edu.sa

Details

Oral presentation

Session #:15
Date: 06/24/2016
Time: 15:00
Location: 317 A/B

Presentation is given by student: No