HannidesAK, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, USA, hannides@hawaii.edu
Sansone, F, J, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, USA, sansone@soest.hawaii.edu
Hebert, A, B, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, USA, ahebert@hawaii.edu
 
PERMEABLE SEDIMENTS AS NUTRIENT REGENERATORS: THE ROLE OF PERMEABILITY IN THE REMINERALIZATION OF SUSPENDED PARTICULATE ORGANIC MATTER (Abstract ID: 683)
Permeable sediments are characterized by fast exchange of solutes across the sediment-water interface (SWI), by their ability to filter out particles from the water column, and by the resulting high organic matter turnover rates. We are testing the hypothesis that these sediments act as rapid nutrient regenerators by trapping particulate organic matter from the water column, rapidly respiring it, and releasing nutrients across the SWI. We present an improved microcosm design used for permeable sediment incubation under controlled water height oscillations. Pore water sampling during experiments enables biogeochemical mass balance calculations and the estimation of decomposition rates and fluxes across the SWI. On-going experiments evaluate the role of permeability on marine algal matter removal, mineralization, and nutrient release, using sediments from a transect across a reef-sand boundary at 10 m depth at the Kilo Nalu Observatory (Honolulu, Hawaii). We compare our experimental observations to field data and infer differences in biogeochemistry and ecosystem function arising from permeability differences along the transect.
 
Presentation is (Oral, Poster or No Preference): Oral
Presentation is given by student: Yes
   
 
           
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