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Archer, S. D., Plymouth Marine Laboratory, Plymouth, United Kingdom, stda@pml.ac.uk
Stephens, J. A., Plymouth Marine Laboratory, Plymouth, United Kingdom, jas@pml.ac.uk
Stefels, J. ., University of Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands, j.stefels@rug.nl
Hopkins, F. J., Plymouth Marine Laboratory, Plymouth, United Kingdom, fjh@pml.ac.uk
Kimmance, S. A., Plymouth Marine Laboratory, Plymouth, United Kingdom, sukim@pml.ac.uk

EXPLANATION OF THE TEMPORAL PROGRESSION OF DMS FLUX FROM A COASTAL UPWELLING SYSTEM

If DMS concentrations are elevated in coastal upwelling waters, the offshore trajectory of air masses that receive the flux may represent a significant source of DMS to the remote marine atmosphere. As part of the NERC UK SOLAS programme we aimed to determine the temporal evolution of DMS flux in the Mauritanian upwelling system as water is driven offshore and alters in physicochemical and biological characteristics. We employed two successive SF6-labelled water masses to provide lagrangian frameworks within an upwelled filament. Concentrations of DMS and its precursor DMSP were monitored and a stable isotope incorporation method used to determine specific DMSP synthesis, loss and turnover rates. We show that differing temporal trends in DMS concentrations in the two water masses could be explained by altering DMSP synthesis rates and turnover of the DMSP pool. We explore the environmental forcing that changes the DMSP synthesis rates and why the balance between DMSP production and loss varies between the two water masses. We use this information to estimate DMS flux from the upwelling system and compare this to observed atmospheric concentrations.

Session #:S28
Date: 02-16-2011
Time: 14:45

Presentation is given by student: No