Home Page | Help | Contact | Log In | Search | Follow us: Official ASLO 2011 ASM Twitter Feed Official ASLO 2011 ASM Facebook Page

Navigation

Serret, P. ., Universidad de Vigo, Vigo, Spain, pserret@uvigo.es
Kitidis, V. ., Plymouth Marine Laboratory, Plymouth, United Kingdom, vak@pml.ac.uk
Robinson, C. ., University East Anglia, Norwich, United Kingdom, Carol.Robinson@uea.ac.uk
Hill, P. ., National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, United Kingdom, polly.hill@noc.soton.ac.uk
Zubkov, M. V., National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, United Kingdom, mvz@noc.soton.ac.uk
Tarran, G. ., Plymouth Marine Laboratory, Plymouth, United Kingdom, Glen Tarran

LAGRANGIAN OBSERVATIONS OF PLANKTON COMMUNITY AND BACTERIAL PRODUCTION AND RESPIRATION ALONG NW AFRICAN UPWELLING FILAMENTS

The NW African shelf is characterised by an intense coastal upwelling that maintains a high biological production. Upwelling filaments transport new nutrients and biota offshore, generating intense biogeochemical and biological gradients, which are complicated by the successional patterns within the evolving filaments. Here we present measurements of plankton abundance, photosynthesis (GPP) and community respiration (CR) made at six depths in the euphotic zone during two 8-days Lagrangian experiments following upwelling filaments offshore the NW African coast. Concurrent measurements of size fractionated (0.2-0.8 and >0.8 um) in vivo electron transport system (ETS) activity, and bacterial production rates were made near the surface to study changes in the bacterial contribution to CR and the bacterial growth efficiency associated to changes in community structure during filament progression. GPP and CR rates ranged ca. 5-50 mmolO2m-3d-1, and 2-10 mmolO2m-3d-1, respectively, with “bacterial” (<0.8um) respiration ranging 11-37% of total CR. Euphotic zone depth integrated GPP/CR balances reached > 2.2 molO2m-2d-1, and remained positive throughout the two 8-days experiments.

Session #:S28
Date: 02-16-2011
Time: 14:00

Presentation is given by student: No