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Loucaides, S. ., University of Southampton (NOCS), Southampton, United Kingdom, s.loucaides@noc.soton.ac.uk
Tyrrell, T. ., University of Southampton (NOCS), Southampton, United Kingdom, tt@noc.soton.ac.uk
Achterberg, E. P., University of Southampton (NOCS), Southampton, United Kingdom, eric@noc.soton.ac.uk
Robinson, C. ., University of East Anglia, Norwich, United Kingdom, Carol.Robinson@uea.ac.uk
Hardman-Mountford, N. ., Plymouth Marine Laboratory, Plymouth, United Kingdom, nhmo@pml.ac.uk

BIOGEOCHEMICAL CYCLING OF CARBON DIOXIDE ALONG AN UPWELLING FILLAMENT OFF CAPE BLANC, NW AFRICA: RESULTS FROM A LAGRANGIAN STUDY

The Mauritanian upwelling region is one of the most biologically productive systems of the world’s oceans. Even so, it remains one of the least investigated upwelling systems. Coastal upwelling drives nutrients, and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) to the surface triggering phytoplankton blooms. It has been shown, however, that upwelling can lead to low calcium carbonate saturation states at the surface which can potentially adversely affect marine organisms, especially calcifiers. An upwelled filament off the coast of NW Africa was followed using drifting buoys and sulphur hexafluoride, as part of the NERC UK SOLAS programme, to determine how the carbonate chemistry of the upwelling water changed under the influence of biological and physicochemical processes. To our knowledge, this lagrangian study is the first of its kind. The initial (day 0) pH of the upwelling plume was 7.9 and the saturation states of calcite and aragonite were 3.2 and 2.1 respectively at the surface. As the plume migrated offshore over a period of 10 days, biological uptake of DIC reduced pCO2 concentrations from 600 to 400 ppm increasing pH to 8.05.

Session #:S28
Date: 02-16-2011
Time: 14:30

Presentation is given by student: No