Program and Agenda

Abstract

INTERACTIONS OF BACTERIAL MICROBIOME WITH BLOOM FORMING MARINE DIATOM PSEUDO-NITZCHIA

The close association of diatom with bacteria is highlighted by the fact that more than 5% of the diatom genome consists of genes derived from bacteria. Our early studies have shown that algal microbiomes are distinct among different Pseudo-nitzschia species and can influence the fitness of their hosts. This study examines the role of bacterial quorum sensing on Pseudo-nitzschia growth and toxin production. Our results show that the addition of quorum sensing auto-inducer I retards the growth of P. fraudulenta and increases the domoic acid production 72 hours post-treatment. Investigations of strategies used by algal microbiomes for nutrient acquisition showed that many members of the microbiome are motile and are attracted towards the algal exudates. One isolated member of the microbiome can utilize domoic acid as the sole carbon source for growth. Molecular identification of this unique bacterium and members of microbiome community that directly utilize algal exudates are currently underway. This study provides a glimpse of microbial interactions in the ocean and human health.

Authors

Rowe, J., University of California, USA, rowejm@uci.edu

Jiang, S., University of California, USA, sjiang@uci.eud

Details

Oral presentation

Session #:128
Date: 2/24/2014
Time: 14:15
Location: 318 AB

Presentation is given by student: No