Program and Agenda

Abstract

A MODELING STUDY TO EXPLORE ON-SHELF TRANSPORT OF OCEANIC ZOOPLANKTON IN THE EASTERN BERING SEA

Despite frontal obstructions to cross-shelf transport, large oceanic copepods dominate the biomass of the outer-shelf zooplankton community of the Eastern Bering Sea. Using a float tracking model modified to represent ontogenetic vertical migration behavior of Neocalanus, we explored transport mechanisms of oceanic zooplankton onto the eastern Bering Sea shelf. Wind direction was the primary factor controlling inter-annual variability in timing, amount, and location of on-shelf transport of our Neocalanus floats. Float transport across the northern and southern shelves responded in opposite directions to wind forcing: southeasterly wind enhanced on-shelf transport along the southern shelf but suppressed on-shelf transport over the northern shelf. Conversely, northwesterly wind suppressed on-shelf transport onto the southern shelf but promoted transport on the northern shelf. On-shelf transport of Neocalanus floats was episodic, reflecting the short duration of the wind forcing. Our results suggest Neocalanus found on the southern shelf likely originate from overwintering sites in the Alaska Stream or Eastern Bering Sea shelf break south of the Pribilof Islands, while Neocalanus found on the northern shelf most likely originate from sites north of the Pribilof Islands.

ePoster: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jmarsys.2013.03.010

Authors

Gibson, G. A., International Arctic Research Center, University of Alaska Fairbanks, USA, ggibson@iarc.uaf.edu

Hermann, A. J., Joint Institute for the Study of the Atmosphere and Ocean, University of Washington, USA, Albert.J.Hermann@noaa.gov

Hedstrom, K., Arctic Region Supercomputing Center, USA, kshedstrom@alaska.edu

Curchitser, E. N., Institute of Marine and Coastal Sciences, Rutgers University, USA, enrique@marine.rutgers.edu

Details

Poster presentation

Session #:088
Date: 2/24/2014
Time: 16:00 - 18:00
Location: Poster/Exhibit Hall

Presentation is given by student: No

PosterID: 1145