Program and Agenda

Abstract

WIND AND SEASON DRIVE MICROBIAL COMMUNITY DIVERSITY IN THE NORTH PACIFIC SUBTROPICAL GYRE AT STATION ALOHA.

Coordinated time series studies of environmental variables and microbial assemblages are key to defining the dynamics of microbial community structure and function. We used ribosomal RNA amplicon and metagenomic sequencing to define microbial communities at 25 m depth over 2 years at the Hawaii Ocean Time-series station ALOHA. We found variation in microbial communities over time, despite a predominantly stratified water column and minimal physical variation across seasons. Diversity metrics derived from rRNA amplions and protein-coding sequences in metagenomic datasets were well correlated with one another. To identify environmental factors that influence microbial community structure, we examined correlates between microbial diversity and environmental parameters measured during HOT cruises and at the WHOTS meteorological buoy. Although few statistically significant relationships were found with most environmental variables, microbial richness was consistently and positively correlated with the average wind speed of days immediately prior to sample collection. This suggested that episodic events could be important determinants of variation in microbial diversity at ALOHA. In addition, microbial community composition was well correlated with average incoming solar radiation, suggesting a significant seasonal dynamic.

Authors

Bryant, J. B., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA, jessawbryant@gmail.com

Eppley, J. M., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA, jmeppley@mit.edu

Karl, D. M., University of Hawaii, USA, dkarl@hawaii.edu

Church, M. J., University of Hawaii, USA, mjchurch@hawaii.edu

DeLong, E. F., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA, delong@mit.edu

Details

Oral presentation

Session #:049
Date: 2/27/2014
Time: 15:15
Location: 313 B

Presentation is given by student: Yes