Program and Agenda

Abstract

DETECTION OF A METEOTSUNAMI WITH HF RADAR

Tsunamis are generally thought of as low-frequency waves that are generated by an underwater disturbance be it an earthquake or landslide. A tsunami can also be generated by an atmospheric disturbance such as a rapid pressure change. These tsunamis are referred to as meteotsunamis because of their meteorological origin. A meteotsunami was detected and tracked off the coast of New Jersey on June 13, 2013. A network of 13 MHz SeaSonde High Frequency radars detected the arrival of the tsunami wave as it approached NJ. The radars first observed the approaching tsunami 23 km offshore, 33 minutes before it arrived at the coast. The radars measured a large offshore surface current, indicative of the leading trough of the tsunami. The detection of a tsunami on the East Coast of the United States with an HF radar is a first of its kind. The measurements by this network will help discern the nature and evolution of this meteotsunami.

ePoster:

Authors

Roarty, H. J., Rutgers University, USA, hroarty@marine.rutgers.edu

Glenn, S. M., Rutgers University, USA, glenn@marine.rutgers.edu

Barrick, D. E., CODAR Ocean Sensors, USA, don@codar.com

Seroka, G., Rutgers University, USA, greg.seroka@gmail.com

Lipa, B., CODAR Ocean Sensors, belinda@lipa.name

Details

Poster presentation

Session #:086
Date: 2/27/2014
Time: 16:00 - 18:00
Location: Poster/Exhibit Hall

Presentation is given by student: No

PosterID: 1813