Program and Agenda

Abstract

SHORT- AND LONG-TERM TEMPORAL VARIABILITY OF IRON AT STATION ALOHA

As a required marine micronutrient, dissolved iron (dFe) plays a role in controlling the distribution of primary production in the open ocean by modulating the rates of both photosynthesis and nitrogen fixation, potentially limiting the growth of marine cyanobacteria in the oligotrophic ocean. Thus, we utilized the Hawaii Ocean Time Series program to explore the factors controlling dFe variability in the oligotrophic North Pacific. Here we report both the long-term monthly variability of total dissolvable Fe in the surface at ALOHA, as well as the daily variability of dFe over the summer 2012-13 seasons (HOE-DYLAN and HOE-PhoR field programs), exploring the role of dust inputs and eddies in each case. We also report the monthly variability of ALOHA dFe profiles to 1500m for summer 2012-13, investigating the role of both biology on the dFe variability in the upper ocean and temporal changes in the Loihi hydrothermal influence on the dFe variability near 1200m. For all datasets, the size partitioning of dFe into soluble and small/large colloids is explored via the measurement of multiple dFe size fractions: <0.4µm, <0.2µm, and <0.02µm.

Authors

Fitzsimmons, J. N., MIT, USA, jessfitz@mit.edu

Zhang, R., SKLEC, East Chinal Normal University, China, rfzhang@sklec.ecnu.edu.cn

Boyle, E. A., MIT, USA, eaboyle@mit.edu

Details

Oral presentation

Session #:049
Date: 2/27/2014
Time: 14:45
Location: 313 B

Presentation is given by student: No