Program and Agenda

Abstract

HIGH SPATIAL AND TEMPORAL RESOLUTION OXYGEN MEASUREMENTS IN THE STRAIT OF GEORGIA AND THEIR RELATIONSHIP TO PRIMARY PRODUCTION

Dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations near the ocean's surface are an indicator of both marine ecosystem and physical processes. To obtain DO (and other oceanographic and meteorological parameters) with high spatial and temporal resolution in the Strait of Georgia, British Columbia, Canada, a suite of instruments have been mounted onto a ferry as part of the VENUS coastal observatory. The ferry travels across the strait 8 times every day, cutting through the Fraser River plume, as well as traversing waters outside the plume. The first 16 months of data shows DO levels of as high as 160% of saturation during spring, and as low as 80% in winter. DO levels are correlated with spring (and other) blooms seen in chlorophyll fluorescence but are not obviously tied to the presence of plume waters. Surprisingly, no diel variation was observed. Further analysis will attempt to explain the significant spatial and temporal variations in DO concentration using knowledge of physical and biological processes in the strait.

ePoster:

Authors

Wang, C., the University of British Columbia, Canada, cnwang@eos.ubc.ca

Pawlowicz, R., the University of British Columbia, Canada, rich@eos.ubc.ca

Details

Poster presentation

Session #:046
Date: 2/26/2014
Time: 16:00 - 18:00
Location: Poster/Exhibit Hall

Presentation is given by student: Yes

PosterID: 2879