Program and Agenda

Abstract

STORY OF MARINE DEBRIS FROM THE 2011 TSUNAMI IN JAPAN IN MODEL SIMULATIONS AND OBSERVATIONAL REPORTS

Impact of marine debris on the environment is becoming an important problem, while monitoring and detection of the debris is still problematic. The driftage generated by the tragic 2011 tsunami in Japan provided a unique opportunity to understand the dynamics of marine debris as it moves across the North Pacific Ocean. The IPRC's SCUD model of near-surface ocean currents, forced by satellite sea level and wind data, was employed to simulate trajectories of tsunami debris. Direct wind effect was included to simulate the drift of objects of different geometry and weight. The model solution visualizes advection of the tracer, its dispersion, and sorting according to the windage by ocean currents and winds. While marine debris observing system that could provide data for quantitative verification of the model is nonexistent, model results were found consistent with scarce reports from (mainly) the coastline and the sea in terms of timing and dynamical composition. This presentation overviews lessons learned since the tsunami and discusses predictability of the fate of the tsunami debris.

Authors

Hafner, J., IPRC/SOEST University of Hawaii, USA, jhafner@hawaii.edu

Maximenko, N., IPRC/SOEST University of Hawaii, USA, maximenk@hawaii.edu

Details

Oral presentation

Session #:140
Date: 2/24/2014
Time: 08:00
Location: 316 B

Presentation is given by student: No