Program and Agenda

Abstract

IMPACT OF WIND, TIDES, AND RIVER FLOW ON CIRCULATION IN THE FRASER RIVER PLUME: THE HF RADAR PERSPECTIVE

The Fraser River meets the ocean near Vancouver in the Strait of Georgia, a semi-enclosed sea on the southwest coast of British Columbia. This is a region of considerable human interest because it is home to 10% of Canada's population, and the Port of Vancouver is the largest and busiest in Canada. Many other user groups, ranging from sport fishing operations to log handling companies, depend on these waters, and therefore understanding the regional oceanography is critically important. In September 2012, an HF radar current mapping system was installed near the Fraser River outflow by the VENUS coastal observing network. Analysis of the first year of data shows that winds and tides generally dominate the circulation over direct effects of river buoyancy and inertia. Surface currents are coherent with winds at frequencies lower than 2 cpd. Surface tidal ellipses are of order 25 cm/s, and show spatial variability not found in barotropic tidal models of the area. The analysis covers times of low river flow, but we expect that the inertial and buoyant effects will be stronger during high flow.

Authors

Halverson, M., University of British Columbia, Canada, mhalvers@eos.ubc.ca

Pawlowicz, R., University of British Columbia, Canada, rich@eos.ubc.ca

Details

Oral presentation

Session #:095
Date: 2/28/2014
Time: 08:15
Location: 301 AB

Presentation is given by student: No