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Glazer, B. T., University of Hawaii, Honolulu, USA, glazer@hawaii.edu

IN SITU ELECTROCHEMISTRY IN EXTREME ENVIRONMENTS: FROM SEAFLOOR HYDROTHERMAL VENTS TO THE DEEP SUBSURFACE BIOSPHERE

Numerous recent advances in ocean science research have been enabled by the development of technological engineering capabilities coupled to the adaptation of cutting edge sensor methodology. Electrochemical methods have often been used to study environmental processes, and in recent years there have been significant advances allowing for real time geochemical measurements with high temporal and/or spatial resolution. One such powerful technique is that of in situ voltammetry, where current is measured while scanning an entire voltage range of the solid-state mercury/gold electrode, allowing the simultaneous measurement of more than one chemical species at a given time. Voltammetry is particularly useful for addressing questions of redox-reactive species distribution and transformation rates at seafloor hydrothermal systems, however significant engineering and methodological challenges exist. Presented here are recent results and lessons learned from a series of deployments of a multi-parameter in situ electrochemical analyzer on DSV Jason-II and DSV Alvin at active vent sites on Loihi Seamount, Hawaii, and CORK Subseafloor Observatories located at IODP boreholes on the Juan de Fuca Ridge Flanks.

Session #:148
Date: 2/21/2012
Time: 15:45
Location: Room 151

Presentation is given by student: No