Home Page | Help | Contact | Log In | Search | Follow us: Official 2012 OSM Twitter Feed Official OSM 2012 Facebook Page

Romine, J. G., USGS Columbia River Research Laboratory, Cook, USA, jromine@usgs.gov
Perry, R. W., USGS Columbia River Research Laboratory, Cook, USA, rperry@usgs.gov
Blake, A. ., USGS Pacific Southwest Area, Sacramento, USA, ablake@usgs.gov
Johnston, S. ., Hydroacoustic Technology, Inc., Seattle, USA, sjohnston@HTISONAR.COM

EFFECTIVENESS OF A NON-PHYSICAL BARRIER ON ROUTE ENTRAINMENT OF MIGRATING JUVENILE SALMONIDS IN THE SACRAMENTO-SAN JOAQUIN RIVER DELTA.

The Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta is a large estuary that has been intensely altered to provide irrigation to California’s Central Valley and domestic water for 27 million people in California. The region consists of an intricate pattern of channels branching from the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers into the interior delta. The interior delta is a location of high mortality for out-migrating ESA listed juvenile salmonids, relative to alternative migration routes. Reducing entrainment to the interior delta is one approach to increasing juvenile salmonid survival. In the spring of 2011, a non-physical barrier (Bio-Acoustic-Fish-Fence or BAFF) consisting of strobe lights, a bubble curtain, and speakers was placed at the confluence of the Sacramento River and Georgiana Slough in an effort to deter smolts from entering Georgiana Slough and passing into the interior delta. Concurrently, 1,500 smolts were acoustically tagged and passively telemetered to determine the effectiveness of the BAFF at deterring smolts from entering the interior delta. Results show that the BAFF reduced passage into Georgiana Slough, but environmental and hydrodynamic variables were also important in determining route entrainment.

Session #:067
Date: 2/23/2012
Time: 15:30
Location: Room 150

Presentation is given by student: No