Sessions


044 Microbially-mediated ecosystem services: The good, the bad and the ugly

Aquatic microbial communities play an integral role in providing key services for society, from the provision of clean water and food to generating direct economic benefits through healthy fisheries, recreation and tourism (“the good”). Microbial communities also generate negative impacts, or disservices, to society that include microbial resistance (“the bad”) and harmful algal blooms (“the ugly”). However, despite the fact that microorganisms – bacteria, archaea and single-celled eurkaryotes- all play important roles in regulating and sustaining multiple ecosystem services, most assessments of well-being only implicitly incorporate microbes, if at all. Microbial science has advanced considerably in recent years due to the advancement of genomic, genetic and other molecular technologies, allowing explorations into ecosystems at impressive spatiotemporal scales, and in response to human actions. Therefore, in this session we explore the state of knowledge on studies that quantitatively address microbially- mediated ecosystem services. We seek studies that explicitly investigate the role of microorganisms in sustaining, regulating, and modulating specific or multiple aquatic ecosystem services. Examples may include examining the role of microbial communities in response to perturbations such as management or stressors, small- and large-scale experiments, biophysical models, metagenome explorations, or data syntheses. We encourage research across aquatic ecosystem types that have established clear connections between ecosystem management and quantitative responses in microbial function, abundance, composition or diversity.

Session organizer(s)

Catherine Febria, University of Canterbury
catherine.febria@canterbury.ac.nz

Mike Beman, University of California Merced
mbeman@ucmerced.edu

Jay Lennon, Indiana University
lennonj@indiana.edu

Stephanie Yarwood, University of Maryland
syarwood@umd.edu



Date: 5/21/2014

Please click on the title of an abstract to view the complete abstract.


Oral Presentations
Location: Oregon Ballroom

16:00
Lennon, J. T.; Stuart, D.; Kent, A. D.; Peralta, A. L.; A SOCIAL-ECOLOGICAL FRAMEWORK FOR MICROMANAGING MICROBIAL SERVICES (Abstract ID:14804) O

16:30
Chapman, E. L.; Lu, Y.; Sponseller, R. A.; Edmonds, J. W.; CONNECTING MICROBIAL COMMUNITY COMPOSITION TO SEASONAL PULSES OF RIVERINE PHYTOPLANKTON PRODUTION (Abstract ID:15060) O

16:45
Bothwell, M. L.; Taylor, B. W.; Kilroy, C.; WHAT CAUSES BLOOMS OF ROCK SNOT? (Abstract ID:13208) O

17:00
Yarwood, S. A.; Prasse, C. E.; Baldwin, A. H.; MICROBIAL COMMUNITY NETWORKS IN TIDAL FRESHWATER WETLANDS (Abstract ID:14152) O

17:15
Nemec, J. A.; Reed, A. J.; Johnson, N. W.; Hicks, R. E.; FINE-SCALE BACTERIAL COMMUNITY AND CHEMICAL CHANGES WITHIN STEEL CORROSION TUBERCLES IN THE DULUTH-SUPERIOR HARBOR (Abstract ID:14549) O

17:30
Giovannoni, S. J.; Jhirad, N.; Vergin, K. L.; CONNECTEDNESS, STABILITY, AND TURNOVER IN OCEANIC MICROBIAL PLANKTON: HOW MUCH IS DRIVEN BY INTERACTIONS? (Abstract ID:15651) O

17:45
Graham, L. E.; Knack, J. J.; Phillippi, E.; Arancibia-Avila, P.; AMPLICON AND METAGENOMIC ANALYSES IDENTIFY METHANOTROPHY AS AN ECOSYSTEM SERVICE PROVIDED BY MICROBIAL EPIBIONTS OF COMMON FRESHWATER PERIPHYTIC ALGAE (Abstract ID:13281) O


Date: 5/22/2014

Please click on the title of an abstract to view the complete abstract.


Poster Presentations
Location: Poster/Exhibit Hall

180
O'Meara, T. A.; DISTRIBUTIONS OF FUNGAL AND BACTERIAL DENITRIFICATION FROM THE MARITIME FOREST TO THE SHALLOW SUB-TIDAL IN TEMPERATE ESTUARINE MARSHES (Abstract ID:13335) P

181
Cohen, D. B.; Stevenson, N. A.; Kent, A. D.; MICROBIAL COMMUNITY COMPOSITION HAS RAMIFICATIONS FOR DENITRIFICATION CAPACITY IN RESTORED WETLANDS (Abstract ID:14404) P

182
Welsh, M. K.; McMillan, S. K.; Vidon, P. G.; IMPACT OF FLOODPLAIN RESTORATION ON RIPARIAN SOIL AND STREAM SEDIMENT DENITRIFICATION POTENTIAL IN THE PIEDMONT REGION OF NORTH CAROLINA (Abstract ID:15503) P