Abstract


WHAT’S IN A BLOOM? EXAMPLES OF DIVERSE ALGAL ASSEMBLAGES FROM TWO EUTROPHIC EMBAYMENTS OF LAKE ONTARIO AND THEIR ECOLOGICAL SIGNIFICANCE

Algal blooms, especially as a consequence of eutrophication, have been of concern in the Great Lakes for over 40 years. Long term monitoring programs in some of the more eutrophic embayments of Lake Ontario have allowed us to capture numerous bloom events and consider their composition in detail. In the Bay of Quinte for example, samples were collected weekly from May to October at a single site beginning in 1973. From 1973 – 1981, a period which included the introduction of phosphorus controls in 1978, we observed 164 algal blooms (n=198). Fewer than 10% of these observations were Cyanobacteria blooms whereas Diatom blooms accounted for >60% of the observations. Sampling frequency was later reduced to bi-weekly. More recent results (2001-2011) show 76 bloom events (n=143) with Cyanobacteria blooms observed 6% of the time and Diatom blooms observed 44% of the time. Of course, such observations are only cursory. The goal of the current paper is to offer detailed taxonomic assessments of algal blooms with multiple examples from the Bay of Quinte and also Hamilton Harbour. The diverse nature of algal blooms (taxonomic, temporal, spatial), their ecological significance and implications for water quality management will be discussed.

Authors

Fitzpatrick, M. A., Fisheries & Oceans Canada, Canada, mark.fitzpatrick@dfo-mpo.gc.ca

Munawar, M., Fisheries & Oceans Canada, Canada

Niblock, H., Fisheries & Oceans Canada, Canada

Rozon, R., Fisheries & Oceans Canada, Canada

Details

Oral presentation

Session #:SS04
Date: 06/06/2016
Time: 14:15
Location: Sweeney Ballroom B

Presentation is given by student: No