Abstract


MANAGEMENT FOR CONTINUED WATER QUALITY IN A PRODUCTIVE, MACROPHYTE DOMINATED RESERVOIR

Elevated atmospheric CO2 and associated climate change, in addition to increasing nutrient use on the landscape, are often attributed as the main causes of increased primary production in lakes. Whether this increased primary production will necessarily result in negative outcomes for water quality, such as toxic cyanobacterial blooms or unchecked macrophyte growth, however, depends on several factors that are not fully understood. Over the past several decades the proliferation of the nuisance macrophyte species Elodea canadensis in Loch Leven, SK, Canada has negatively impacted recreational use, and cyanobacterial blooms have intermittently raised concerns about lake management practices. Alternative stable states theory suggests that any mitigation approaches that solely remove the macrophyte biomass without addressing the root causes of eutrophication will favour potentially toxic cyanobacterial blooms. Here, we present the results of a contemporary field study and a paleolimnolgical analysis of the water quality of Loch Leven to determine the underlying causes of increased production. These results are framed within an adaptive management framework that seeks to minimize proliferation of cyanobacterial blooms while still maintaining recreational use of the lake.

Authors

Finlay, K., University of Regina, Canada, kerri.finlay@uregina.ca

Vogt, R. J., University of Quebec at Montreal, Canada, richvogt@gmail.com

Details

Oral presentation

Session #:SS04
Date: 06/07/2016
Time: 10:30
Location: Sweeney Ballroom B

Presentation is given by student: No