Abstract


RECONSTRUCTING CYANOBACTERIA TOXIN PRODUCTION FROM THE SEDIMENT RECORD: EVIDENCE FROM SHALLOW, SUBTROPICAL LAKE GRIFFIN, FLORIDA, USA

Cyanotoxins are secondary metabolites produced by cyanobacteria and are found in water bodies around the world causing negative effects on aquatic ecosystems and human health. There are numerous environmental and biological triggers for toxin production, and the ecological role of most toxins is still being determined. Whereas cyanobacterial toxin occurrence appears to be expanding and monitoring efforts have increased in recent years, the history of toxin existence in lakes is poorly understood. Here, I report the history of the cyanotoxin, cylindrospermopsin, in sediments of hypereutrophic Lake Griffin, Florida, USA from ca. 4,700 years ago to present. The record includes three periods of toxin abundance: one associated with recent, European settlement in the watershed, and the other two during the middle to late Holocene, prior to human impacts on the lake. Each period corresponds to changes in different paleolimnological measurements suggesting drivers of cylindrospermopsin production have varied through time. This cylindrospermopsin record demonstrates the use of sediment toxin concentrations as a tool to reconstruct historic cyanobacterial toxin occurrence and shows that toxin production can occur independent of anthropogenic stressors.

Author

Waters, M. N., Auburn University, USA, mnwaters@ymail.com

Details

Oral presentation

Session #:SS04
Date: 06/06/2016
Time: 14:00
Location: Sweeney Ballroom B

Presentation is given by student: No