Abstract


RAPID EVOLUTIONARY ADAPTATION OF HARMFUL CYANOBACTERIA TO CHANGES IN CO2 AVAILABILITY (S)

Harmful cyanobacterial blooms threaten the water quality of many eutrophic lakes and reservoirs worldwide. Here, we show rapid microevolutionary adaptation of the cyanobacterium Microcystis to changes in inorganic carbon (Ci) availability. Microcystis displays genetic variation in the Ci uptake systems BicA and SbtA, where BicA has a low affinity for bicarbonate but high flux rate, whereas SbtA has a high affinity but low flux rate. Laboratory competition experiments showed an increase of the bicA genotype at the expense of bicA+sbtA genotypes at elevated CO2. Similarly, in a eutrophic lake, bicA+sbtA strains were dominant when Ci concentrations were depleted during a dense cyanobacterial bloom, but were replaced by strains with only the high-flux bicA gene when Ci concentrations increased later in the season. Hence, our results provide both laboratory and field evidence that increasing carbon concentrations induce rapid adaptive changes in the genotype composition of harmful cyanobacterial blooms.

Authors

JI, X., University of Amsterdam, Netherlands, x.ji@uva.nl

Sandrini, G., University of Amsterdam, Netherlands, G.Sandrini@uva.nl

Verspagen, J. M., University of Amsterdam, Netherlands, J.M.H.Verspagen@uva.nl

Matthijs, H. C., University of Amsterdam, Netherlands, J.C.P.Matthijs@uva.nl

Huisman, J., University of Amsterdam, Netherlands, J.Huisman@uva.nl

Details

Oral presentation

Session #:SS04
Date: 06/06/2016
Time: 08:45
Location: Sweeney Ballroom B

Presentation is given by student: Yes