Program & Agenda

Public Events

AquaScience Theater 2016: films, videos, movies that communicate water science

Date: Tuesday, 7 June 2016   Time: 19:00 - 21:30
Location: Sweeney Ballroom E-F

The advent of YouTube, Vimeo, Vine and other online video outlets have made it easier than ever to communicate scientific discovery and the scientific process to various audiences, from the general public to policy makers to students at all levels. This session will feature short videos and excerpts and trailers from longer films. Film and video works to be shown will include:

The Complexity of Aquatic Invasions in the Colorado River Basin - Part 1

Date: Thursday, 9 June 2016   Time: 15:00 - 16:00
Location: Pojoaque/Nambe/Ohkay Owingeh

The Colorado River Basin covers six million hectares in the United States and Mexico. The river crosses Native American Tribal Lands and public lands including Canyonlands and Grand Canyon National Parks and Curecanti, Glen Canyon and Lake Mead National Recreation Areas. The Colorado River is a lifeline across a spectacular and arid landscape, supplying water to more than 27 million people, irrigating 1.2 million hectares of farmland and generates hydro-electric power used throughout the Southwest. More than 20 million visitors use the park lands within the basin for recreation annually. Aquatic invasive species have emerged as a significant issue facing the basin.

Quagga Mussels in particular represent a case study of invasion of the west; with early discovery in the Lower Colorado River and subsequent discoveries in California, Nevada and Utah systems. While mussels have successfully invaded, the ecosystem impacts have been less predictable than in other areas; degrading water quality in some while seemingly not impacting others. Invasive species can cause significant economic losses, as well as ecological change including reductions to overall system resiliency. Addressing aquatic invasive species within the basin has required a diverse, inter-agency response that integrates knowledge and promotes scientific stewardship of aquatic resources. This session discusses ecosystem changes, management issues, and current research related to aquatic invasive species in the Colorado River Basin.

Please see the session schedule for more information.

The Complexity of Aquatic Invasions in the Colorado River Basin - Part 2

Date: Friday, 10 June 2016   Time: 15:00 - 16:00
Location: Pojoaque/Nambe/Ohkay Owingeh

The Colorado River Basin covers six million hectares in the United States and Mexico. The river crosses Native American Tribal Lands and public lands including Canyonlands and Grand Canyon National Parks and Curecanti, Glen Canyon and Lake Mead National Recreation Areas. The Colorado River is a lifeline across a spectacular and arid landscape, supplying water to more than 27 million people, irrigating 1.2 million hectares of farmland and generates hydro-electric power used throughout the Southwest. More than 20 million visitors recreate in park lands annually within the basin. Aquatic invasive species have emerged as a significant issue facing the basin.

Quagga Mussels in particular represent a case study of invasion of the west; with early discovery in the Lower Colorado River and subsequent discoveries in California, Nevada and Utah systems. While mussels have successfully invaded, the ecosystem impacts have been less predictable than in other areas; degrading water quality in some while seemingly not impacting others. Invasive species can cause significant economic losses, as well as ecological change including reductions to overall system resiliency. Addressing aquatic invasive species within the basin has required a diverse, inter-agency response that integrates knowledge and promotes scientific stewardship of aquatic resources. This session discusses ecosystem changes, management issues, and current research related to aquatic invasive species in the Colorado River Basin.

Please see the session schedule for more information.