Early Registration Deadline
12 February 2010

Travel Award & Grant Recipients Notified
March 2010

Authors Notified
April 2010

Schedule Posted
January 2010

Bencala, K. E., USGS, Menlo Park, CA, USA, kbencala@usgs.gov
Kimball, B. A., USGS, West Valley City, CA, USA, bkimball@usgs.gov
Gooseff, M. N., Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, USA, mgooseff@engr.psu.edu

CHALLENGES IN THINKING FROM TRANSIENT STORAGE AND HYPORHEIC FLOW TO STREAM-CATCHMENT CONNECTIONS

Although surface- and ground-water are increasingly talked about as ‘one resource’, there remains environmental and ecosystem need to study the 10-100m reach scale as ‘one hydrologic system’. Streams gain and lose water over a range of spatial and temporal scales. Large scales (kilometers) have traditionally been recognized and studied as river-aquifer connections. Over the last 25 years hyporheic (1 - 10m) exchange flows have been studied extensively. Often a Transient Storage Model (TSM) has been used to quantify the physical solute transport setting in which biogeochemical processes occur. At longer 10 -100m scales, the interpretation of seemingly straightforward questions about water, contaminant, and nutrient fluxes into and along a stream can be confounded by flow losses which are too small to be apparent in stream gauging and along flow paths too long to be detected in tracer experiments. Extending the simple exchange concept of the TSM presents challenges in determining field estimates of solute residence time and water source connectivity in the catchment, as well as the stream-catchment water balance.

http://water.usgs.gov/nrp/proj.bib/bencala.html

Session #:S20
Date: 06-11-10
Time: 16:45

Presentation is given by student: No