Home Page | Help | Contact | Log In | Search

Navigation

Presenters Notified: November 2012

Program Schedule Posted:November 2012

Abstracts Available: January 2013

Meeting:
17-22 February 2013

Robidart, J. C., UCSC/MBARI, USA, jrobidart@ucsc.edu
Church, M. J., University of Hawaii, Manoa, USA, mjchurch@hawaii.edu
Ryan, J. P., Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, USA, ryjo@mbari.org
Wilson, S. T., University of Hawaii, Manoa, USA, stwilson@hawaii.edu
Ascani, F., University of Hawaii, Manoa, USA, fascani@hawaii.edu
Marin III, R., Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, USA, maro@mbari.org
Richards, K., University of Hawaii, Manoa, rkelvin@hawaii.edu
Karl, D. M., University of Hawaii, Manoa, USA, dkarl@hawaii.edu
Scholin, C. A., Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, USA, scholin@mbari.org
Zehr, J. P., University of California, Santa Cruz, USA, jpzehr@ucsc.edu

APPLICATION OF HIGH RESOLUTION AUTONOMOUS TIME SERIES TO DETECT PATTERNS OF NITROGEN FIXING CYANOBACTERIA IN THE NORTH PACIFIC OCEAN

Candidatus Atelocyanobacterium thalassa is an unusual nitrogen fixing unicellular cyanobacterium with broad worldwide distributions and relatively consistent presence in the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre (NPSG). Using long-term as well as high-resolution autonomous time series data from this region, we have determined that summer abundances of A. thalassa are uniquely sensitive to subtle changes in ocean physics and chemistry relative to other cyanobacteria. High physical variability near the edge of an anticyclonic eddy resulted in high population heterogeneity. The nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria Trichodesmium and Crocosphaera were also quite abundant at the eddy’s edge but did not exhibit the same degree of patchiness. Summer A. thalassa abundances correlate robustly with phosphate concentration, and this summer trend has only been repeatable since a climate-driven shift in the region in 2009. In surface waters in the NPSG, phosphate concentration is depleted in more saline waters. While future climate effects remain undetermined, based on these trends increased evaporation in a warming ocean may correspond with lower phosphate and decreased abundances of A. thalassa locally, altering patterns of gross nitrogen fixation rates in the NPSG.

Oral presentation

Session #:SS33
Date: 2/20/2013
Time: 11:00