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Presenters Notified: November 2012

Program Schedule Posted:November 2012

Abstracts Available: January 2013

Meeting:
17-22 February 2013

Mayfield, K. K., University of Hawaii at Manoa, USA, kimmayfield@hotmail.com
Peucker-Ehrenbrink, B., Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute, USA, behrenbrink@whoi.edu
Calabro, R., Save the Bay: Narragansett, USA, rcalabro@savebay.org
Cole Ekberg, M., Save the Bay: Narragansett, USA, mcole@savebay.org
Prescott, D., Save the Bay: Narragansett, USA, dprescott@savebay.org

THE BIOGEOCHEMISTRY OF SMALL PASSIVE MARGIN RIVERS ALONG THE NORTHERN U.S. EAST COAST

Anthropogenic influences on river biogeochemistry are most easily studied by investigating smaller rivers in intensely urbanized and cultivated watersheds. We have studied major, minor, trace ion and nutrient concentrations, as well as strontium (Sr) isotope ratios in four rivers draining Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts: the Blackstone, Pawcatuck, Pawtuxet, and Taunton rivers. Over the course of one year, we observed little variability in the ion or nutrient ratios. Historically, however, the sodium concentrations of all four rivers have increased since the1950s, probably driven by the use of sodium-rich compounds in wastewater treatment facilities. Nutrient concentrations were consistently lower in the Pawcatuck River and higher in the Pawtuxet River, which, respectively, represent the least and most developed watersheds of this study. The radiogenic Sr isotope ratios varied from 0.711 to 0.717, the most radiogenic being the Taunton River, indicating that its dissolved composition is derived from relatively older bedrock and/or higher Rb/Sr ratios. Each river has a clearly identifiable, rather invariable Sr isotopic signature, which supports the hypothesis that Sr isotopes can be utilized as source tracers of the dissolved load.

Poster presentation

Session #:SS77
Date: 2/21/2013
Time: 18:00 - 19:30