Program & Agenda

Workshops and Town Halls

Pacific Marine Analysis and Research Association - Linking Science to Decision Making - Introduction to Marxan

Date: Wednesday, 22 February 2017   Time: 08:00 - 17:00
Location: Off-Site Location

Location: Suanders Hall 2424, University of Hawaii at Manoa

This is a pre-meeting workshop sponsored by PacMARA. This hands-on three-day technical course will provide participants with the basic knowledge and skills necessary to use Marxan in a marine conservation planning exercise. The following topics will be covered over the three days of this course: Key concepts in systematic conservation planning Creating planning units Creating the essential Marxan input files Parameter setting in Marxan Understanding and using Marxan results Zonae Cogito (front-end Marxan support software)

Introduction to Marxan with Zones During the third day participants will also have the opportunity to work on their own planning scenarios, starting with the definition of their project objectives and identification of data needs. Participants will also discuss what type of cost information is more suitable for their projects and how to set targets for conservation features. The course will take place in Honolulu, Hawaii, on February 22, 23 and 24, 2017.

To register, please visit our website at: http://pacmara.org/events-workshops

Course fees are US$545 for students (including Postdoctoral fellows) and US$745 for non-students. These fees increase after 8 February 2017. For more information visit www.pacmara.org or contact Norma Serra at nserra@pacmara.org Course cancellation policy: PacMARA reserves the right to cancel Marxan courses at any time. Generally, courses will be confirmed at least two weeks (and no later than one week) before the start date of a course. If PacMARA must cancel a course due to low attendance or unforeseen circumstances beyond the control of PacMARA, you are entitled to a full refund of the course fee, or your course fee can be credited towards a future course. PacMARA is not responsible for travel fees, or any expenses incurred by you as a result of such cancellation. Every effort will be made to avoid cancelling any planned course, but please understand that as a charitable organization we must cover the costs involved.

Addtional information: https://www.sgmeet.com/aslo/honolulu2017/static/files/MarxanCourse-Poster-Hawaii.pdf

Pacific Marine Analysis and Research Association - Linking Science to Decision Making - Introduction to Marxan

Date: Thursday, 23 February 2017   Time: 08:00 - 17:00
Location: Off-Site Location

Location: Suanders Hall 2424, University of Hawaii at Manoa

This is a pre-meeting workshop sponsored by PacMARA. This hands-on three-day technical course will provide participants with the basic knowledge and skills necessary to use Marxan in a marine conservation planning exercise. The following topics will be covered over the three days of this course: Key concepts in systematic conservation planning Creating planning units Creating the essential Marxan input files Parameter setting in Marxan Understanding and using Marxan results Zonae Cogito (front-end Marxan support software)

Introduction to Marxan with Zones During the third day participants will also have the opportunity to work on their own planning scenarios, starting with the definition of their project objectives and identification of data needs. Participants will also discuss what type of cost information is more suitable for their projects and how to set targets for conservation features. The course will take place in Honolulu, Hawaii, on February 22, 23 and 24, 2017.

To register, please visit our website at: http://pacmara.org/events-workshops

Course fees are US$545 for students (including Postdoctoral fellows) and US$745 for non-students. These fees increase after 8 February 2017. For more information visit www.pacmara.org or contact Norma Serra at nserra@pacmara.org Course cancellation policy: PacMARA reserves the right to cancel Marxan courses at any time. Generally, courses will be confirmed at least two weeks (and no later than one week) before the start date of a course. If PacMARA must cancel a course due to low attendance or unforeseen circumstances beyond the control of PacMARA, you are entitled to a full refund of the course fee, or your course fee can be credited towards a future course. PacMARA is not responsible for travel fees, or any expenses incurred by you as a result of such cancellation. Every effort will be made to avoid cancelling any planned course, but please understand that as a charitable organization we must cover the costs involved.

Addtional information: https://www.sgmeet.com/aslo/honolulu2017/static/files/MarxanCourse-Poster-Hawaii.pdf

Pacific Marine Analysis and Research Association - Linking Science to Decision Making - Introduction to Marxan

Date: Friday, 24 February 2017   Time: 08:00 - 17:00
Location: Off-Site Location

Location: Suanders Hall 2424, University of Hawaii at Manoa

This is a pre-meeting workshop sponsored by PacMARA. This hands-on three-day technical course will provide participants with the basic knowledge and skills necessary to use Marxan in a marine conservation planning exercise. The following topics will be covered over the three days of this course: Key concepts in systematic conservation planning Creating planning units Creating the essential Marxan input files Parameter setting in Marxan Understanding and using Marxan results Zonae Cogito (front-end Marxan support software)

Introduction to Marxan with Zones During the third day participants will also have the opportunity to work on their own planning scenarios, starting with the definition of their project objectives and identification of data needs. Participants will also discuss what type of cost information is more suitable for their projects and how to set targets for conservation features. The course will take place in Honolulu, Hawaii, on February 22, 23 and 24, 2017.

To register, please visit our website at: http://pacmara.org/events-workshops

Course fees are US$545 for students (including Postdoctoral fellows) and US$745 for non-students. These fees increase after 8 February 2017. For more information visit www.pacmara.org or contact Norma Serra at nserra@pacmara.org Course cancellation policy: PacMARA reserves the right to cancel Marxan courses at any time. Generally, courses will be confirmed at least two weeks (and no later than one week) before the start date of a course. If PacMARA must cancel a course due to low attendance or unforeseen circumstances beyond the control of PacMARA, you are entitled to a full refund of the course fee, or your course fee can be credited towards a future course. PacMARA is not responsible for travel fees, or any expenses incurred by you as a result of such cancellation. Every effort will be made to avoid cancelling any planned course, but please understand that as a charitable organization we must cover the costs involved.

Addtional information: https://www.sgmeet.com/aslo/honolulu2017/static/files/MarxanCourse-Poster-Hawaii.pdf

Aquatic Science Education and Outreach: Broadening the Reach of Your Science

Date: Sunday, 26 February 2017   Time: 09:00 - 12:00
Location: 308 A/B

This workshop will focus on helping participants develop ideas for effective education and outreach activities. Featuring active, hands-on learning, small group discussions, and guided inquiry, this workshop will include short presentations on exemplary projects in formal and informal education designed for K-12, undergraduate, graduate, and public audiences to stimulate ideas. Discussions of how people learn, how to assess the effectiveness of outreach activities, and how to develop projects that meet specific goals will help support project development. Participants are welcome to bring ideas that they would like to develop and share, and for which they would like to receive feedback. For more information regarding this workshop, please contact Bob Chen, bob.chen@umb.edu. This workshop is open to all attendees.

ASLO Leadership Workshop

Date: Sunday, 26 February 2017   Time: 09:00 - 12:00
Location: 306 A

The purpose of the workshop is to build leadership skills and approaches among ASLO members so that they may feel comfortable to take on leadership roles in the Society and other scientific organizations and teams. The workshop organizers will invite 20 to 30 ASLO members of a range of seniorities from the list of those expressing leadership experience and interest in membership surveys. (They will be glad to entertain requests from early career members seeking leadership roles, too!). Debbie Bronk and Jon Downing will first discuss the importance of leadership in science, discuss their own experiences and present skills and approaches that were useful in their leadership. Next they will review leadership opportunities in ASLO, including board procedures, and build a discussion about how leadership roles can be beneficial from a personal, societal, and scientific basis. We will keep discussions informal to allow substantial conversation and Q&A. The workshop will conclude around the end of the ASLO Board meeting so that workshop participants can meet with the current Board and officers to hear about recent Board proceedings. Inquiries should be sent to downing@umn.edu and bronk@vims.edu. Participation is by Invitation Only for this workshop.

Science Communications Lab. Yes, LAB. Section 1

Date: Sunday, 26 February 2017   Time: 09:00 - 12:00
Location: 303 B

The Science Communication Lab in Honolulu will help you improve your communications skills so you can present your work more effectively. The Hollywood entertainment industry has traditionally been the source of both innovation and perfection of narrative elements. The same approach is applicable to the communication of science to all audiences, from the general public to fellow academics. Communications expert, Brian Palermo, will return to ASLO to lead the 2017 workshops. He is a professional actor and improv instructor (e.g., The Social Network, The Tonight Show with Jay Leno, the Groundlings Theatre, Los Angeles). It will build on the success of previous workshops by Palermo (2012, 2013), also organized by Jonathan Sharp (University of Delaware) and Adrienne Sponberg (ASLO). There will be two (identical) 3-hour workshops (10:00-13:00, 14:00-17:00) on Sunday before the formal opening of the 2017 Aquatic Sciences Meeting. Participation in one of the workshop sessions will be limited and prior registration will be required (no fee). Open to all attendees, but participation in the workshop is limited, so, please be committed to attend if you register. Register at: http://bit.ly/SunWkshp Financial support for this workshop has been received from the Ocean Sciences Division of the US National Science Foundation. For more information about this workshop, please contact Jonathan Sharp, jsharp@udel.edu.

Cyber Tools and Resources for Research and Analysis

Date: Sunday, 26 February 2017   Time: 09:00 - 16:00
Location: 323 B

Digital tools, resources, and capabilities are exploding. This workshop will be structured as a series of mini-workshops throughout a day designed to (1) make researchers more aware of a vast range of new tools, resources, and databases, (2) highlight uses for some particularly relevant tools of interest to ASLO attendees, (3) show some of the current planning for an EarthCube workbench that can help tie these tools together to address workflows, and (4) hear from you about your greatest workflow, data, and analysis challenges.

The workshop is free but registration is required (email: crescyntrcn@gmail.com). Sponsored by NSF EarthCube CRESCYNT, Coral Reef Science and Cyberinfrastructure Network (http://crescynt.org) along with other EarthCube members and groups (http://earthcube.org). For more information on this workshop, please contact Ouida Meier, University of Hawaii, at omeier@hawaii.edu.  This workshop is open to all attendees, but registration is required.

 

Best Practices in Mentoring

Date: Sunday, 26 February 2017   Time: 13:00 - 16:00
Location: 306 B

This workshop will explore best practices in mentoring. Good mentoring includes advising high school, undergraduate, graduate, and post-doctoral research, guiding early career scientists, broadening participation in Aquatic Science, and establishing a network of productive colleagues. Participants will share best practices across a wide variety of mentoring situations, explore strategies to address a diversity of mentoring scenarios, and dig deeply into personal experiences to uncover both productive and non-productive mentoring situations. Come join us for an energetic workshop that will help you become a better mentor. For more information regarding this workshop, please contact Bob Chen, bob.chen@umb.edu.

Demystifying the Teaching Philosophy Statement for Academic Job Applications

Date: Sunday, 26 February 2017   Time: 13:00 - 16:00
Location: 302 A/B

Seeking a career in academia – in teaching, research, or both? Regardless of your academic career path, chances are, you will need to include a teaching philosophy statement in your application package. In this workshop we will cover the elements of a good teaching philosophy statement and how to customize statements to match job descriptions and get your application noticed. Participants will leave the workshop with a working outline or draft of their own statement to complete at home for their next application. Please register for the event online at https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/2017TPS.

FlowCam and FlowCam 'Macro' Workshop

Date: Sunday, 26 February 2017   Time: 13:00 - 16:00
Location: 301 B

The FlowCam® is a continuous imaging flow cytometer and particle analyzer designed for conducting research and monitoring of microorganisms and particles in both marine and freshwater systems. Developed at Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences, the FlowCam is manufactured by Fluid Imaging Technologies of Scarborough, Maine USA. Fluid Imaging will be conducting a 3-hour workshop demonstrating the new FlowCam 8000 and the new FlowCam ‘Macro’. Applicatio ns for the FlowCam 8000 include the following: • Identify and enumerate phytoplankton and micro zooplankton • Monitor HABS in both marine and freshwater systems • Characterize particles with fluorescing probes: lipid analysis, FISH probes, cell viability • Analyze sediment: tephra particles, marine foraminifera, paleolimnology The FlowCam ‘Macro’ is Fluid Imaging’s latest product, incorporating the FlowCam’s technology into an instrument capable of providing high resolution images and data for zooplankton and particles ranging in size from 250µm up to 5mm in size. The workshop will feature a 20-minute presentation of FlowCam applications followed by hands-on experience with the instrument. Attendees are encouraged to bring samples – whether they be from cultures or freshwater or marine systems, phytoplankton or zooplankton - to run on the FlowCam 8000 or FlowCam Macro. http://info.fluidimaging.com/aslo-2017-flowcam-workshop-hands-on-demonstration The workshop will be limited to 30. Register by contacting Frances Buerkens frances.buerkens@fluidimaging.com. This workshop is open to all, but advance registration is necessary. For more information, please contact Harry Nelson, harry.nelson@fluidimaging.com.

U.S. Coast Guard Icebreaker HEALY Workshop

Date: Sunday, 26 February 2017   Time: 13:00 - 16:00
Location: 304 A/B

Learn about opportunities to conduct research in the Arctic Ocean and Bering Sea from the US Coast Guard's icebreaker Healy. Healy is the only US icebreaker dedicated to Arctic research. Learn about Healy's scientific facilities and watch short movies of Healy in the Arctic conducting science. This workshop is open to all attendees. The full workshop will be facilitated on Sunday from 13:00 to 16:00. Movies will be shown, and the program will be discussed during lunch on Monday and Tuesday. For more information, please contact David Forcucci at David.Forcucci@uscg.mil.

Science Communications Lab. Yes, LAB.Section 2.

Date: Sunday, 26 February 2017   Time: 13:00 - 16:00
Location: 303 B

The Science Communication Lab in Honolulu will help you improve your communications skills so you can present your work more effectively. The Hollywood entertainment industry has traditionally been the source of both innovation and perfection of narrative elements. The same approach is applicable to the communication of science to all audiences, from the general public to fellow academics. Communications expert, Brian Palermo, will return to ASLO to lead the 2017 workshops. He is a professional actor and improv instructor (e.g., The Social Network, The Tonight Show with Jay Leno, the Groundlings Theatre, Los Angeles). It will build on the success of previous workshops by Palermo (2012, 2013), also organized by Jonathan Sharp (University of Delaware) and Adrienne Sponberg (ASLO). There will be two (identical) 3-hour workshops (10:00-13:00, 14:00-17:00) on Sunday before the formal opening of the 2017 Aquatic Sciences Meeting. Participation in one of the workshop sessions will be limited and prior registration will be required (no fee). Open to all attendees, but participation in the workshop is limited, so, please be committed to attend if you register. Register at: http://bit.ly/SunWkshp Financial support for this workshop has been received from the Ocean Sciences Division of the US National Science Foundation. For more information about this workshop, please contact Jonathan Sharp, jsharp@udel.edu.

National Science Foundation Division of Ocean Sciences Town Hall

Date: Monday, 27 February 2017   Time: 13:00 - 14:30
Location: 302 A/B

An update from the U.S. National Science Foundation, Division of Ocean Sciences, regarding recent developments in research funding, infrastructure, and education. A budgetary outlook and discussion of Division of Ocean Sciences initiatives throughout the Division portfolio will be presented. Rick Murray, Division Director, will provide a brief presentation, to be followed by a question-and-answer session. National Science Foundation Program Officers will also be present to provide additional information as needed. For more information regarding this town hall, please contact Roxanne Nikolaus, rnikolau@nsf.gov.

Teaching Introductory Aquatic and Environmental Sciences

Date: Monday, 27 February 2017   Time: 13:00 - 14:30
Location: 301 B

Introductory environmental and aquatic science courses provide an excellent opportunity to prepare both majors and non-majors for thinking about some of the largest issues facing society such as climate change and energy needs. Introductory courses can also serve to recruit students from highly diverse backgrounds into the field. Often, these courses are large (>50 students). This workshop will provide strategies to overcome some of the challenges of these large introductory courses while making your teaching engaging, relevant, and effective. Come ready to share ideas, to think actively about teaching and learning, and to discuss what works and why. For more information regarding this workshop, please contact Bob Chen, bob.chen@umb.edu.

Meet the ASLO Editors Luncheon

Date: Monday, 27 February 2017   Time: 13:00 - 14:30
Location: 315

Join ASLO publication editors for lunch to discuss publishing in and reviewing for ASLO journals, as well as broader issues about scientific publications. Box lunches will be available on a first-come, first-served basis. This workshop is open to all attendees. For more information, please contact Teresa Curto, ASLO Executive Director, execdir@aslo.org.

Flushing Our Future

Date: Monday, 27 February 2017   Time: 13:00 - 14:30
Location: 306 A

This Town Hall event will connect and engage scholars, other experts, community members, students and decision-makers in the examination of the status of wastewater treatment in Hawai'i. Hawai'i’s experience includes elements facing communities throughout the U.S. and worldwide, but in a geographically delimited insular environment. As such, Hawai’i provides a tractable model from which to generate solutions to wastewater management in a world experiencing rapidly changing climate, population growth and ageing infrastructure. Just as wastewater management is a multifaceted issue, we will address this issue via a multidisciplinary lens. By coupling recognition and acknowledgement of diverse perspectives and the best available science, workshop participants will examine, gain a better understanding of, and establish a foundation from which practical and effective solutions to the challenges of wastewater management can be envisioned. The natural, social and design sciences and Native Hawaiian perspectives will be drawn on to frame issues, discuss local efforts and brainstorm solutions. Multidisciplinary cluster faculty of the University of Hawai'i at Manoa focused on sustainability and community outreach will each provide their impressions and expertise on this issue forming, in aggregate, a thoughtful and reasoned foundation for identifying specific challenges and seeking applied solutions. This event is open to all attendees. For more information, please contact Daniele Spirandelli, University of Hawaii Sea Grant College, at danieles@hawaii.edu.

Bystander Intervention for Combating Sexual Misconduct in Science: Everyone Can Be Part of the Solution

Date: Monday, 27 February 2017   Time: 13:00 - 14:30
Location: 308 A/B

Many within the science community have been shocked and disturbed to hear news reports of egregious sexual misconduct among our fellow scientists in recent years. In addition to such high-profile incidents, a 2014 study demonstrated that sexual harassment and assault during field research is a common occurrence, typically involving junior women scientists targeted by senior male colleagues. We all recognize that this problem must be addressed, but how can individuals make a contribution to shifting a culture that tolerates sexual misconduct, often in subtle ways? We can start by recognizing that the solution must come from all of us, not just those who experience sexual harassment and assault. This workshop will explore the approach of bystander intervention to empower and equip individuals with the knowledge, motivation, and skills to make our field inclusive and supportive of all its members, in particular our female colleagues. Jane Stapleton of the Prevention Innovations Research Center at the University of New Hampshire will use case studies and interactive exercises to teach attendees how to be engaged bystanders to intervene before, during and after instances of sexual and relationship violence and stalking. This workshop is intended for all attendees at every career stage, and we especially encourage senior faculty and PIs to attend, as their role in positions of authority has an outsized influence on the culture of their professional communities.

Speaker Biographical Information: Jane Stapleton, M.A., Executive Director of Practice at the University of New Hampshire Prevention Innovations Research Center – Jane’s current research and evaluation projects include serving as a subject matter expert for revision and evaluation of the US Army Sexual Harassment Assault Response Prevention (SHARP) training programs, funded by the US Army; evaluation technical assistance to New Hampshire Rape, Prevention and Education (RPE) grantees, funded by the Centers for Disease, Control and Prevention; and project director to develop a bystander intervention video game to prevent sexual assault on college campuses, funded by the National Institute of Justice. She collaborates with StopHazing and is particularly interested in the intersections and connections between hazing and sexual assault. She recently completed an evaluation of Circles of Safety, a Stop It Now! bystander intervention curriculum to stop child sexual abuse on university campuses, funded by the Paterno family foundation. She is a lead developer and evaluator of the Know-Your-Power® Bystander Social Marketing Campaign and is working to expand the mediums for disseminating the campaign. Jane trains colleges, universities and community organizations how to facilitate Bringing in the Bystander® and implement comprehensive strategies to end violence. She coordinates the National Campus Sexual and Relationship Violence and Stalking Prevention Consortium and previously coordinated three cycles of the University of New Hampshire Campus Grant to end Dating and Domestic Violence, Sexual Assault and Stalking, funded by the US Department of Justice. Jane provides training and technical assistance to colleges and universities in the United States and Canada on how to create, evaluate and sustain comprehensive sexual and relationship violence and stalking prevention strategies. She was one of the founding members of the Sexual Harassment and Rape Prevention Program (SHARPP) at UNH, only the second rape crisis center on a college campus in the United States. She has provided direct services to survivors, developed, facilitated and evaluated prevention programs and directed campus-wide efforts (including policy development and systems’ advocacy) to end sexual and relationship violence and stalking on the UNH campus. She served on the Board of Directors for the School and College Organization for Prevention Educators (SCOPE) and the Board of Directors of the New Hampshire Coalition Against Domestic Violence. She teaches in the Women’s Studies Program at UNH. As an activist, administrator, policy maker, service provider and researcher, she has worked in the field of ending sexual and relationship violence and stalking for 30 years.

U.S. Coast Guard Icebreaker HEALY Workshop

Date: Monday, 27 February 2017   Time: 13:00 - 14:30
Location: 304 A/B

Find out about opportunities to use the Healy for High Latitude research in the Arctic. Learn about Healy facilities and economical day rate. Movies of Healy missions in the Arctic as well as interactive display of the oceanographic facilities. This workshop is open to all attendees. The full workshop will be facilitated on Sunday from 13:00 to 16:00. Movies will be shown, and the program will be discussed during lunch on Monday and Tuesday. For more information, please contact David Forcucci at David.Forcucci@uscg.mil.

U.S. Coast Guard Icebreaker HEALY Workshop

Date: Tuesday, 28 February 2017   Time: 13:00 - 14:30
Location: 304 A/B

Find out about opportunities to use the Healy for High Latitude research in the Arctic. Learn about Healy facilities and economical day rate. Movies of Healy missions in the Arctic as well as interactive display of the oceanographic facilities. This workshop is open to all attendees. The full workshop will be facilitated on Sunday from 13:00 to 16:00. Movies will be shown, and the program will be discussed during lunch on Monday and Tuesday. For more information, please contact David Forcucci at David.Forcucci@uscg.mil.

Marginal Ice Zone Workshop

Date: Tuesday, 28 February 2017   Time: 13:00 - 14:30
Location: 313 C

This workshop is a follow-on to Session 004 Biogeochemical Cycling of Trace Elements and Isotopes in the Arctic Ocean.

Interdisciplinary Presentations Workshop

Date: Tuesday, 28 February 2017   Time: 13:00 - 14:30
Location: 302 A/B

Limnology and Oceanography as multi-disciplinary sciences, combine aspects of physics, chemistry, biology, and geology; and often include socio-economics. You can make a presentation at a meeting with narrow scope, using specialized terminology, not explaining the relevance of your results, and presenting in a boring fashion. This is fine for a small number of specialty peers. However, if you want to reach and appeal to a broader interdisciplinary audience, you need another approach. This workshop will address things to make presentations more engaging and appealing to those outside your specialty. This workshop is open to all. It is organized by Jonathan Sharp (University of Delaware), Adrienne Sponberg (ASLO); using the skills of communications expert, Brian Palermo (professional actor and improv instructor at the Groundlings Theatre in Los Angeles). Organizers will attend a few presentations early in the 2017 Honolulu Aquatic Sciences Meeting. Then at the workshop, they will use those talks as examples, illustrating how to make improvements to transform a solid presentation into one that is memorable and compelling to a broad interdisciplinary audience. This workshop is open to all attendees. This effort is partially supported by a grant from the Ocean Sciences Division of the US National Science Foundation. For more information about this workshop, please contact Jonathan Sharp, jsharp@udel.edu.

Town Hall - AquaWatch, The GEO Water Quality Community of Practice

Date: Tuesday, 28 February 2017   Time: 13:00 - 14:30
Location: 323 A

AquaWatch is the Group on Earth Observations (GEO) Water Quality Community of Practice. The aim of AquaWatch is to develop an international operational water quality information system based on Earth observation with a focus on the developing world. The overall goal of AquaWatch is to produce a global water quality monitoring and forecasting service within 10 years. AquaWatch will accomplish this goal by incrementally completing service-related projects and tasks that will be integrated into the overarching global activity. Current projects include the development of a global turbidity and reflectance product and the production of an informational booklet highlighting the functionality of prototype projects targeted at educating potential end users and funders about water quality monitoring. The purpose of this open town hall meeting is to update the water quality community on the past year’s activities and provide a forum to discuss issues relevant to the AquaWatch effort. For more information regarding this town hall, please contact Steven Greb, steven.greb@wisconsin.gov. This town hall is open to all attendees.

Working at a Community College and Engaging Community College Faculty and Students

Date: Tuesday, 28 February 2017   Time: 13:00 - 14:30
Location: 306 A

Community colleges play a crucial role in undergraduate STEM education. They enroll 12.8 million students, approximately 45% of all U.S. undergraduates. A higher percentage of minorities underrepresented in the STEM fields attend two-year institutions than four-year institutions. Nearly one-half of Americans who receive bachelor’s degrees in science and engineering and one-third of recipients of science or engineering master’s degrees attended a community college at some point in their education. Community colleges are also important in teacher preparation with almost forty percent of the nation’s teachers completing some of their STEM courses at community colleges. In this session we will provide insights into the community colleges’ missions, faculty, students, and curriculum. In so doing, we hope to assist the growing number of graduates, post-docs and faculty interested in exploring a community college career, or those who desire to partner with community college faculty to improve STEM education, or are interested in engaging community college students in research activities. For more information regarding this event, please contact Jan Hodder, jhodder@uoregon.edu. This event is open to all attendees.

Ocean Science and Technology: Open Discussion on Federal Research Plan

Date: Tuesday, 28 February 2017   Time: 18:30 - 20:00
Location: 304 A/B

In a time of environmental, political, and social change, a cohesive Federal strategy to advance ocean science and technology, in partnership with other sectors and levels of government, will set the stage for inspired action in the coming decade for the good of the ocean and the Nation. With substantial community input, the Subcommittee on Ocean Science and Technology under the National Science and Technology Council is developing a plan on Ocean Research in the Coming Decade (the Plan) describing the most pressing research questions and most promising areas of opportunity to guide Federal planning. This interactive session will seek input and gather information from the science and technology community to guide the continued development of the Plan, including societal issues that stimulate ocean research and technology and the activities needed to address compelling local, regional, national, and global challenges. The Plan will focus on science, technology, and innovation to advance ocean research and promote its societal relevance. Because the ocean is a component of the larger Earth system with a highly influential human dimension, the Plan will address multi-faceted topics with relevance to ocean, polar, terrestrial, freshwater, atmospheric, and social research. It will be complementary to and informed by related research carried out by other Federal activities, non-Federal efforts, and international entities. For more information regarding this workshop, please contact Jessica McGrath, jfmcgrat@nsf.gov. This workshop is open to all attendees.

Science Videos that Engage

Date: Tuesday, 28 February 2017   Time: 19:30 - 21:30
Location: 301 B

This workshop designed to help you make effective, engaging and compelling videos will be led by Brian Palermo, professional actor and improv instructor (e.g., The Social Network, The Tonight Show with Jay Leno, the Groundlings Theatre, Los Angeles). It will build on the success of previous workshops with both Palermo (2012, 2013) and marine biologist-turned filmmaker Randy Olson (2010-2013), organized by Jonathan Sharp (University of Delaware) and Adrienne Sponberg (ASLO). Participants are invited to submit a short video (not to exceed 5 minutes in YouTube format; *Submit your video: http://bit.ly/VideoWkshp. All submitted videos will be posted and discussed online prior to the meeting; several will be screened and discussed at the workshop. Palermo will review features of participant-submitted as well as other videos that create a connection and resonate with the public. This is not a “how to” workshop but more of commentary on existing videos with an eye towards creating the most effective narrative and connection with audience. Submissions are encouraged from all attendees, including: a broad array of graduate students, early career scientists, more established scientists, professional filmmakers, high school teachers, etc. This workshop is open to all attendees. This effort is partially supported by a grant from the Ocean Sciences Division of the US National Science Foundation. For questions about this event, please contact Jonathan Sharp, jsharp@udel.edu.

Sea Grant Research: Understanding how Sea Grant funding can help your research program

Date: Wednesday, 1 March 2017   Time: 13:00 - 14:30
Location: 301 A

For 50 years NOAA’s National Sea Grant College Program (Sea Grant) has been putting science to work for America’s coastal communities. This town hall event will provide an overview of the Sea Grant research program, highlight our successes, and provide valuable insights on how to apply for Sea Grant funding. The informal lunch discussion is open to anyone that is interested in Sea Grant research funding and graduate student support. Early career scientists will learn how to utilize Sea Grant projects to launch larger research initiatives and take their science to the next level through our vast extension and education networks. Sea Grant celebrated our 50th anniversary in 2016. After 50 successful years we are looking ahead to the future and hope you will join us as we grow and meet new research challenges facing our coasts and oceans. Lunch will be provided. Panel Participants: Linda Duguay; Director of the University of Southern California (USC) Sea Grant Program and President of the Association for the Sciences of Limnology and Oceanography. Jon Downing; Director of the University of Minnesota Sea Grant College Program. Others include Sea Grant ASLO researchers and early career scientists. For more information about this event, please contact Rebecca Briggs, rebecca.briggs@noaa.gov. This workshop is open to all attendees.

Sharing Science through Storytelling

Date: Wednesday, 1 March 2017   Time: 13:00 - 14:30
Location: 302 A/B

"Communicating science to the general public, policymakers, students, and even scientists outside your discipline can be challenging. But the importance of communicating beyond our peers is increasing. Therefore, scientists should adopt a communication strategy that has been fundamental to the development of our society, the art of storytelling. Storytelling has been a tool for sharing knowledge and ideas for thousands of years. A good story can evoke wonder, which fosters greater interest in complex scientific discoveries, enables a better understanding of the scientific method, and emphasizes the importance of science to society. In this workshop, you will learn 1) the basic elements of storytelling, 2) get ideas on how to structure your science into a story, 3) how to spot common science communication mistakes when telling a good story, like using jargon or drafting long sentences, and 4) how (and where) to share your science stories. Participants are encouraged to bring a current or past conference abstract and plan to leave the workshop ready to turn your science abstract into a well-crafted science story. Participants should register using the following link https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/2017Storytelling. For more information, please contact Kylla Benes, Kbenes@uci.edu. This workshop is open to all attendees.

NSF Arctic Sciences Town Hall

Date: Wednesday, 1 March 2017   Time: 13:00 - 14:30
Location: 301 B

This town hall will provide updates on NSF's Arctic Sciences Section and an opportunity to meet with Program Directors from ARCSS and AON. This town hall is open to all attendees. https://www.nsf.gov/geo/plr/arc/index.jsp. For more information, please contact Neil Swanberg, National Science Foundation, nswanber@nsf.gov

Writing a great application for graduate school and for the NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Program

Date: Wednesday, 1 March 2017   Time: 13:00 - 14:30
Location: 304 A/B

Each year GRFP awards 2,000 new fellowships for graduate students pursuing research-based Master’s and doctoral degrees in science and engineering.  Each Fellowship consists of three years of support during a five-year fellowship period.  NSF provides a stipend of $34,000 to the Fellow and a cost-of-education allowance of $12,000 to the graduate degree-granting institution for each Fellow who uses the fellowship support in a fellowship year.

NSF especially encourages women, members of underrepresented minority groups, persons with disabilities, veterans, and undergraduate seniors to apply.  This workshop for undergraduates and beginning graduate students will provide tips and strategies for preparing effective fellowship applications and graduate school application research statements. Workshop activities include review and discussion of anonymous research statements and application preparation tips from GRFP awardees and NSF program officers. The event URL: www.nsfgrfp.org

This workshop is open to all attendees. Students are particularly encouraged to attend. For more information, please contact: M. Brandon Jones, PhD, Program Director, Education and Diversity, mbjones@nsf.gov

MOSAiC International Arctic Drift Expedition

Date: Wednesday, 1 March 2017   Time: 18:30 - 20:30
Location: 302 A/B

The Multidisciplinary Observatory to Study Arctic Climate is a planned year-long drift aboard the RV Polarstern that is scheduled to begin in Autumn 2019. This organizational meeting is intended to inform all interested attendees of ASLO 2017 about the goals and objectives for MOSAiC. The meeting will highlight proposals for science activities that are currently in the works, welcome new ideas, and describe the process for participation. This meeting is open to all attendees and will focus on the Biogeochemistry portion of the MOSAiC science plan. Event URL: http://www.mosaicobservatory.org/. For more information regarding this town hall meeting, please contact: Brice Loose at bloose@uri.edu

Ocean Issues in The Upcoming U.S. National Climate Assessment

Date: Thursday, 2 March 2017   Time: 13:00 - 14:30
Location: 306 A

The next congressionally-mandated U.S. National Climate Assessment (NCA), due in 2018, includes a specific chapter on climate-related impacts on Ocean and Marine Resources as well as Regional Chapters that may include region-specific ocean information. The Ocean chapter in the previous NCA (2014) highlighted issues such as rising ocean temperatures, increasing ocean acidification, changing habitats, shifting distributions of marine species (including diseases) and some implications for ocean-dependent businesses and communities. The authors of the current NCA seek feedback from the ASLO community on key topics to cover based on recent advancements in knowledge, including case studies and critical information sources. The presentation will provide information on the overall NCA report process, connection to other major climate reports, timeline and current draft focal areas, followed by open discussion with participants. This town hall is open to all attendees. For more information, please contact Fred Lipschultz, U.S Global Change Research Program, at flipschultz@usgcrp.gov

Scientific Publication Workshop - An Evening with the Editors in Chief of ASLO's Limnology & Oceanography and AGU's Journal of Geophysical Research – Biogeosciences

Date: Thursday, 2 March 2017   Time: 18:30 - 20:30
Location: 301 B

In this workshop, the Editors in Chief from two leading journals in aquatic science research (AGU's Journal of Geophysical Research - Biogeosciences and ASLO's Limnology & Oceanography) will host a workshop focused on key issues in the scientific publication process. The workshop will be a collection of short presentations and discussions on topics such as: “What makes a good paper?,” “Selecting the correct journal,” and “Peer review for authors.” The workshop is targeted to scientists in the early stages of their career who want to learn about the writing and publication of scientific research articles. Refreshments and light hors d’oeuvres will be provided. If you plan to participate in this workshop, please register at: http://www.cvent.com/d/4vqtqt.

For more information regarding this workshop, please contact Miguel Goni, mgoni@coas.oregonstate.edu. This workshop is open to all attendees.

 

CISME Training Workshop (Coral In Situ MEtabolism)

Date: Monday, 6 March 2017   Time: 09:00 - 17:00
Location: Off-Site Location

You are invited to a free CISME Training Workshop, to be held at the Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology from March 6-8, 2017, the week after the ASLO meeting.   CISME is a new diver-portable, underwater respirometer designed to make   non-destructive metabolic “vital signs” measurements (respiration,   photosynthesis and calcification) of corals and other low-relief benthic   organisms or substrates in situ. The name derives from Coral In Situ   MEtabolism, and is pronounced ‘kiss-me’ to reflect the gentle   interaction between the instrument and corals, benthic algae and benthic   organisms. The workshop objective is to disseminate information about   CISME and train potential users on the operation and value of the   instrument.  We have a set of 6 CISME instruments that will be available   for short-term loan to qualified/trained individuals who want to   explore how CISME will benefit their research or monitoring programs.    AAUS or similar diving certification is required for the second day of   the workshop. Instructors:  Drs. Alina Szmant and Robert Whitehead, UNCW   Center for Marine Science. More information and procedure for applying   can be found in the full workshop invitation on the ASLO website. For   further information, contact: Dr. Alina M. Szmant, Center for Marine   Science UNCW, szmanta@uncw.edu;  phone number (910)962-2362 or   (910)200-3913. We have a small amount of funding to help junior   participants with travel costs.

Aaddtional workshop infoprmation: https://www.sgmeet.com/aslo/honolulu2017/static/files/CISME-workshop-invitation.pdf

CISME Training Workshop (Coral In Situ MEtabolism)

Date: Tuesday, 7 March 2017   Time: 09:00 - 17:00
Location: Off-Site Location

You are invited to a free CISME Training Workshop, to be held at the Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology from March 6-8, 2017, the week after the ASLO meeting.   CISME is a new diver-portable, underwater respirometer designed to make   non-destructive metabolic “vital signs” measurements (respiration,   photosynthesis and calcification) of corals and other low-relief benthic   organisms or substrates in situ. The name derives from Coral In Situ   MEtabolism, and is pronounced ‘kiss-me’ to reflect the gentle   interaction between the instrument and corals, benthic algae and benthic   organisms. The workshop objective is to disseminate information about   CISME and train potential users on the operation and value of the   instrument.  We have a set of 6 CISME instruments that will be available   for short-term loan to qualified/trained individuals who want to   explore how CISME will benefit their research or monitoring programs.    AAUS or similar diving certification is required for the second day of   the workshop. Instructors:  Drs. Alina Szmant and Robert Whitehead, UNCW   Center for Marine Science. More information and procedure for applying   can be found in the full workshop invitation on the ASLO website. For   further information, contact: Dr. Alina M. Szmant, Center for Marine   Science UNCW, szmanta@uncw.edu;  phone number (910)962-2362 or   (910)200-3913. We have a small amount of funding to help junior   participants with travel costs.

Aaddtional workshop infoprmation: https://www.sgmeet.com/aslo/honolulu2017/static/files/CISME-workshop-invitation.pdf

CISME Training Workshop (Coral In Situ MEtabolism)

Date: Wednesday, 8 March 2017   Time: 09:00 - 17:00
Location: Off-Site Location

You are invited to a free CISME Training Workshop, to be held at the Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology from March 6-8, 2017, the week after the ASLO meeting.   CISME is a new diver-portable, underwater respirometer designed to make   non-destructive metabolic “vital signs” measurements (respiration,   photosynthesis and calcification) of corals and other low-relief benthic   organisms or substrates in situ. The name derives from Coral In Situ   MEtabolism, and is pronounced ‘kiss-me’ to reflect the gentle   interaction between the instrument and corals, benthic algae and benthic   organisms. The workshop objective is to disseminate information about   CISME and train potential users on the operation and value of the   instrument.  We have a set of 6 CISME instruments that will be available   for short-term loan to qualified/trained individuals who want to   explore how CISME will benefit their research or monitoring programs.    AAUS or similar diving certification is required for the second day of   the workshop. Instructors:  Drs. Alina Szmant and Robert Whitehead, UNCW   Center for Marine Science. More information and procedure for applying   can be found in the full workshop invitation on the ASLO website. For   further information, contact: Dr. Alina M. Szmant, Center for Marine   Science UNCW, szmanta@uncw.edu;  phone number (910)962-2362 or   (910)200-3913. We have a small amount of funding to help junior   participants with travel costs.

Aaddtional workshop infoprmation: https://www.sgmeet.com/aslo/honolulu2017/static/files/CISME-workshop-invitation.pdf