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DIARRHETIC SHELLFISH POISONING TOXIN CONCENTRATIONS AND DINOPHYSIS ABUNDANCE IN MONTEREY BAY, CALIFORNIA

Toxic algal blooms of Dinophysis spp., a dinoflagellate that produces Diarrhetic Shellfish Poisoning (DSP) toxins, have recently become a concern in U.S. coastal waters. The first shellfish closure in the U.S. due to DSP toxins occurred in Texas in 2008. The first clinical report of DSP in the U.S. occurred in Washington in 2011, when three people got sick after consuming mussels containing DSP toxins. Toxigenic species of Dinophysis are found in Monterey Bay, California with concentrations reaching up to 18,900 cells/L, but DSP toxins are not routinely monitored in the area and had not been consistently tested since 2005. This study looks at a three-year record (2013-2016) of Dinophysis occurrence and DSP toxins found in Monterey Bay at the Santa Cruz Wharf. Okadaic acid and two dinophysis toxins, DTX1 and DTX2, were detected in California mussel (Mytilus spp.) tissue, with toxin concentrations occasionally rising above 0.16 ppm total okadaic acid equivalents, the FDA action level established in 2011. These data serve to establish a baseline of DSP toxin concentrations in Monterey Bay and provide an example of how monitoring for DSP toxins can be integrated into CDPH’s pre-existing Marine Biotoxin Monitoring program.

Authors

Shultz, D. M., University of California Santa Cruz, USA, dmshultz@ucsc.edu

Hayashi, K., University of California Santa Cruz, USA, khayashi@ucsc.edu

Kudela, R. M., University of California Santa Cruz, USA, kudela@ucsc.edu

Details

Poster presentation

Session #:021
Date: 03/03/2017
Time: 11:00 - 12:00
Location: Poster/Exhibit Hall

Presentation is given by student: Yes

PosterID: 227