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DEFINING INTERDISCIPLINARY SOLUTIONS FOR INLAND HABS: THE NEED FOR TOXICOLOGY TO INFORM RISK MANAGEMENT

We propose an interdisciplinary approach to assessment and management of Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs) is required to mitigate impacts on the uses of inland water resources, including public health and drinking water, commercial fisheries, and recreation. While observation of HAB species is important to understanding the potential magnitude and extent of blooms we still lack information regarding mixtures of toxins exposures and consequences of these mixtures associated with designated uses of inland waters. Thus, it is necessary to define the extent and magnitude of risks to HAB toxins within an ecosystems. Advances in mechanistic ecotoxicology and bioaccumulation studies make it possible to determine the contributions of HAB exposure through various environmental media and routes. Approaches such as aggregate exposure pathways (AEPs) provide a framework to guide exposure assessments. Further, traditional measures of aquatic toxicity may not be appropriate for assessing effects on ecosystems. In these cases other indicators of exposure leading to adverse outcomes to aquatic, terrestrial and humans must be determined. For example, specific changes in cellular biology using an adverse outcome pathway (AOP) approach should be employed. Molecular and biochemical responses of aquatic organisms can be difficult to relate to effects on humans or other critical receptors. However, such sublethal effects in organisms from affected ecosystems or model organisms examined in situ can be used as early indicators of exposure and potential risks. Once risks are more defined then operational and management guidelines can be developed for HAB management and prevention in inland waters.

Authors

Steevens, J. A., U.S.G.S., USA, jsteevens@usgs.gov

Brooks, B. W., Baylor University, USA, bryan_brooks@baylor.edu

Details

Oral presentation

Session #:021
Date: 03/01/2017
Time: 10:30
Location: 323 B

Presentation is given by student: No