View Abstract

HETEROGENEITY OF TOXIN-PRODUCING CYANOBACTERIA AT A SEASONAL CREEK/OCEAN INTERFACE

In recent years there has been heightened recognition of presence of cyanobacteria and associated toxins at the land-sea interface. To examine connectivity and potential transport from fresh water to seawater, we conducted a monthly sampling effort of seasonal creeks that enter the Pacific Ocean in the Southern California Bight, USA. Results presented here were obtained from one locality where we examined three sites extending into the watershed. Samples were collected on a monthly basis over a period of one year. There were pronounced spatial and temporal differences in cyanobacterial composition and detectable toxins from discrete benthic and plankton samples. Of particular concern was the co-occurrence of multiple toxins which may be partially influenced by dynamic salinity regimes in these systems. Our findings highlight the need for further assessments that set the stage for the implementation of monitoring programs for cyanotoxins at the land-sea interface.

Authors

Tatters, A. O., University of Southern California, USA, tatters@usc.edu

Howard, M. D., SCCWRP, USA, meredithh@sccwrp.org

Webb, E. A., University of Southern California, USA, eawebb@usc.edu

Caron, D. A., University of Southern California, USA, dcaron@usc.edu

Details

Poster presentation

Session #:021
Date: 03/03/2017
Time: 11:00 - 12:00
Location: Poster/Exhibit Hall

Presentation is given by student: No

PosterID: 223