View Abstract

UNRAVELLING DRIVERS OF METHANE EMISSIONS IN A SUBTROPICAL FRESHWATER RESERVOIR

Methane emissions from freshwater reservoirs represent a potentially important global methane source. However, reported emission rates can vary by over 3 orders of magnitude within an individual system due to the relative contribution of ebullition. Key to understanding the variability in emission rates is to better understand the primary drivers of different emission pathways and ebullition in particular. Zones of catchment organic material as well as elevated water column chlorophyll a concentration have been associated with increased rates of ebullition. Little Nerang Dam, a subtropical freshwater reservoir, consistently experiences high rates of ebullition adjacent major inflow arms and these inflow arms are both deposition zones of catchment organic material as well as areas containing relatively elevated water column chlorophyll a concentration. A year-long study was undertaken in which emission rates, water column chlorophyll a concentration and sediment organic matter content were monitored. In addition, atmospheric pressure, water level and wind speed was recorded and the relative importance of methane emissions drivers will be explored.

Authors

Grinham, A., The University of Queensland, Australia, a.grinham@uq.edu.au

Dunbabin, M., Queensland University of Technology, Australia, m.dunababin@qut.edu.au

Albert, S., The University of Queensland, Australia, s.albert@uq.edu.au

Details

Oral presentation

Session #:001
Date: 03/03/2017
Time: 14:30
Location: 306 A

Presentation is given by student: No