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OCEAN WARMING SINCE 1982 HAS EXPANDED THE NICHE OF HARMFUL ALGAL BLOOMS IN THE NORTH ATLANTIC AND NORTH PACIFIC OCEANS

Global ocean temperatures are rising, yet the impacts of such changes on harmful algal blooms (HABs) are not fully understood. Here, we used high resolution sea surface temperature records (1982-2015) and temperature-dependent growth rates of two algae that produce potent biotoxins, Alexandrium fundyense and Dinophysis acuminata¬, to evaluate recent changes in these HABs. For both species, potential mean annual growth rates and bloom seasons significantly increased within many coastal Atlantic regions between 40°N and 60°N where incidents of these HABs have emerged and expanded in recent decades. Widespread trends were less evident across the North Pacific, however, regions were identified near the Salish Sea and along the Alaskan coastline where blooms have recently emerged and there have been significant increases in the potential growth rates and duration of these HABs. We conclude that increasing ocean temperature is an important factor in facilitating the intensification of these, and likely other, HABs and thus contributes to an expanding human health threat.

Authors

Gobler, C. J., Stony Brook University, USA, christopher.gobler@stonybrook.edu

Doherty , O. M., Eagle Rock Analytics, USA, owen.michael.doherty@gmail.com

Hattehrath-Lehmann, T. K., Stony Brook University, USA, theresa.hattenrath@stonybrook.edu

Griffith, A. W., Stony Brook University, USA, andrew.griffith@stonybrook.edu

Kang, Y., Stony Brook University, USA, yoonja.kang@stonybrook.edu

Litaker, W., NOAA, USA, wayne.litaker@noaa.gov

Details

Oral presentation

Session #:021
Date: 03/02/2017
Time: 14:45
Location: 323 B

Presentation is given by student: No