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TEMPORAL AND SPATIAL DISTRIBUTIONS OF HARMFUL CYANOBACTERIA BLOOMS IN THE WESTERN BASIN OF LAKE ERIE DURING A SMALL BLOOM YEAR (E)

Since the 1990s Lake Erie has seen an increase in algal blooms especially those characterized by large concentrations of harmful cyanobacteria such as Microcystis. In 2014, the bloom was toxic enough that the water treatment plant in Toledo, Ohio had to be shut down leaving nearly 400,000 people without water for two days. However, there was little to no harmful algae bloom (HAB) present in 2016. With increasing temperatures it was predicted that blooms would increase as well. For 2016, four sites were selected for water collection at each site throughout the Canadian side of the Western Basin of Lake Erie. At these four sites, water was collected at four different depths. These water samples were analyzed for soluble reactive phosphorus, total phosphorus, nitrate, and chlorophylla. Microscopic and genetic techniques were used to analyze community composition. Microscopic analysis showed temporal and spatial differences in composition based on site, depth, and date. Pelee Island showed higher concentrations of Microcystis compared to any other site in the western basin especially in August and September. These concentrations were especially high at one and three metres. Understanding the factors determining the relative abundance of algal species in the water column is essential for predicting the development of HABs.

Authors

Owen, J. M., University of Windsor- GLIER, Canada, owenj@uwindsor.ca

Haffner, G. D., University of Windsor- GLIER, Canada, haffner@uwindsor.ca

Details

Oral presentation

Session #:021
Date: 03/02/2017
Time: 10:45
Location: 323 B

Presentation is given by student: Yes