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PCMHAB: IMPLEMENTING THE KARENIA “TRICORDER” TO IMPROVE RED TIDE MONITORING AND MANAGEMENT IN THE GULF OF MEXICO

Red tides in Florida coastal waters (principally Karenia brevis blooms) cause millions of dollars lost in tourism, agriculture, seafood, and leisure industries in the US. The overarching goal of our studies is to develop, demonstrate, and transfer hand-held genetic sensors for K. brevis detection to end users that monitor the coastal and estuarine waters of the Gulf of Mexico. Currently the detection and enumeration of K. brevis employs light microscopy of Lugol’s-fixed samples. The problems with this approach that it takes highly trained individuals to differentiate the toxic K. brevis from its non-toxic relatives (K. papillonacea, K. mikimotoi and others). The specific objectives of our project include: I-Enhancement of hand-held genetic sensors for K. brevis detection through research and development. II-Demonstration and validation of K. brevis sensors in field and lab trials. III- Transfer of technology to end-users and integration of genetic data into HAB observing networks. We have evaluated three genetic platforms (USF QuadPyre, the Douglas Scientific AmpliFireTM and the Biomeme two3 ) and have chosen the AmpliFireTM based upon stability, reproducibility, and durability. A 3 month study of K. brevis abundance in Bayboro Harbor, St. Petersburg, FL indicated a high fidelity between microscope counts and those determined genetically (R-squared = 0.9778).

Authors

Paul, J. H., University of South Florida, USA, jpaul@usf.edu

Hubbard, K., FWC, USA, kate.hubbard@mfwc.org

Nieuwkerk, D., University of South Florida, USA, nieuwke@mail.usf.edu

Ulrich, R., university of South Florida, USA, bob@puremolecular.com

Tilney, C., FWC, USA, charles.tilney@myfwc.com

Hoaglund, A., FWC, USA, alicia.hoaglund@myfwc,com

Olesin, E., FWC, USA, emily.olesin@myfwc.com

Details

Oral presentation

Session #:021
Date: 03/01/2017
Time: 12:15
Location: 323 B

Presentation is given by student: No