Abstract


ADAPTATION TO LIGHT COLOR IN THE OCEAN: INSIGHTS FROM COMPARATIVE ANALYSES OF MARINE SYNECHOCOCCUS GENOMES AND PHYCOBILISOME GENE REGIONS FROM THE FIELD

Synechococcus cyanobacteria display a wide pigment diversity that has allowed members of this genus to colonize virtually all lit, marine environments from the equator to the polar circles. This diversity rests on the variability of the pigment composition of their light-harvesting complexes (phycobilisomes). A preliminary comparative genome analysis of 11 Synechococcus genomes had shown that most genes involved in the synthesis of phycobilisome rods are gathered into a specialized region of the genome. Here, we have extended the comparison to 43 other marine Synechococcus genomes, including 32 new ones that were assembled using a pipeline including a semi-automatic scaffolding step by the custom-designed software WiseScaffolder and a genome finishing step that led to the closure of 29 of them. Comparison of all these genomes have allowed us to identify novel configurations of the phycobilisome gene region as well as a small genomic island specific of chromatic acclimaters. Additionally, we have obtained partial or complete phycobilisome regions from field Synechococcus populations coming from various environments, using a custom-designed protocol including flow cytometric cell sorting, whole genome amplification and cloning into fosmids to specifically target and sequence these genomic regions. This has notably shown the prevalence of chromatic acclimaters in some environments. Altogether, these genomic and metagenomic analyses have also allowed us to get novel insights about the evolution of pigment diversity in this ecologically important group and to propose a revised classification of pigment types based on both cell pigment content and associated genomic features.

http://www.sb-roscoff.fr/Phyto/

Authors

PARTENSKY, F., UMR7144 CNRS & UPMC, Station Biologique de Roscoff, France, partensky@sb-roscoff.fr

GREBERT, T., UMR7144 CNRS & UPMC, Station Biologique de Roscoff, France, theophile.grebert@sb-roscoff.fr

HUMILY, F., UMR7144 CNRS & UPMC, Station Biologique de Roscoff, France, florian.humily@gmail.com

FARRANT, G. K., UMR7144 CNRS & UPMC, Station Biologique de Roscoff, France, gregory.farrant@sb-roscoff.fr

RATIN, M., UMR7144 CNRS & UPMC, Station Biologique de Roscoff, France, morgane.ratin@sb-roscoff.fr

BISCH, A., UMR7144 CNRS & UPMC, Station Biologique de Roscoff, France, antoine.bisch@sb-roscoff.fr

PITT, F. D., School of Life Sciences, University of Warwick, Gibbet Hill Road, Coventry CV4 7AL, United Kingdom, Frances.D.Pitt@warwick.ac.uk

SCANLAN, D. J., School of Life Sciences, University of Warwick, Gibbet Hill Road, Coventry CV4 7AL, United Kingdom, D.J.Scanlan@warwick.ac.uk

GARCZAREK, L., UMR7144 CNRS & UPMC, Station Biologique de Roscoff, France, laurence.garczarek@sb-roscoff.fr

Details

Oral presentation

Session #:075
Date: 2/26/2015
Time: 15:30
Location: Andalucia 1 (Floor 1)

Presentation is given by student: No