Abstract


INFLUENCE OF AVIAN VECTORS AND LAKE CHEMISTRY ON CONNECTIVITY AMONG NATIVE ARTEMIA FRANCISCANA POPULATIONS IN PRAIRIE CANADA

Artemia franciscana (Anostraca) is a highly invasive species that has spread worldwide through its use as fish food in aquaculture. We present novel information on its genetic diversity in its native North America, particularly in prairie Saskatchewan where the species is widespread in natural, endorreic hypersaline lakes with relatively undeveloped catchment areas. Using a combination of microsatellites and mitochondrial DNA, we describe the population structure among 20 different lakes. We show a high level of structure, even though this crustacean is readily dispersed by abundant migratory waterbirds (as viable resting eggs in bird faeces). We show that isolation by ecology is more important than isolation by distance. Genetic differences between lakes are strongly related to divergent water chemistry, which derives from relatively recent glaciations in that region, with some influence of potash mining. Using mitochondrial markers, we compare and contrast our results for population connectivity in Artemia with another anostracan in Saskatchewan: the sympatric and partly syntopic Branchinecta spp. We also consider how our results differ from those found for introduced populations of A. franciscana in the Mediterranean region.

Authors

Lejeusne, C., Univ. Pierre & Marie Curie (Paris 6) - CNRS / Roscoff Biological Station, France, clejeusne@sb-roscoff.fr

Frisch, D., University of Oklahoma Biological Station, USA, dfrisch@sistern.net

Sánchez, J., Doñana Biological Station - CSIC, Spain,

Green, A. J., Doñana Biological Station - CSIC, Spain, ajgreen@ebd.csic.es

Details

Oral presentation

Session #:007
Date: 2/25/2015
Time: 17:45
Location: Albeniz (Floor -2)

Presentation is given by student: No