Abstract


ARE MARINE INVERTEBRATES MORE SUSCEPTIBLE TO INFECTIONS UNDER THE PRESSURE OF CLIMATE CHANGE?

Ocean acidification is a consequence of changing climate. At a pH level predicted to occur by the end of this century we found that invertebrates suffer immune suppression. This suppression is exaggerated by already existing stressors, such as manganese that is released from bottom sediments during hypoxic events. The metal is essential for all organisms but in surplus we have demonstrated immune disturbances in both Norway lobsters Nephrops norvegicus, blue mussels Mytilus edulis, and sea stars Asterias rubens. Reduced bactericidal capacity was observed when they encountered pathogenic bacteria of the genus Vibrio, which are natural inhabitants of the ocean. Studies on vibrios have indicated that the bacteria are favored by rising temperature and are persistent to these environmental stressor. We conclude that climate change in combination with existing stressors may force the animals to a tipping point when interacting with pathogens. This has great impact on animal health and may affect population survival and biomass and as well increase the risk for bacterial transmission to consumers.

http://www.hkr.se/bodil-hernroth-en

Authors

Hernroth, B. E., Kristianstad University, Sweden, bodil.hernroth@hkr.se

Baden, S. P., University of Gothenburg, Sweden, susanne.baden@bioenv.gu.se

Details

Oral presentation

Session #:032
Date: 2/24/2015
Time: 11:45
Location: Auditorium Federico Garcia Lorca (Floor 0)

Presentation is given by student: No